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Section VII: Academics

Academic Honors

Richard Bland College recognizes outstanding achievement among its students. For academic honors, non-credit developmental courses are not included in determining full-time status or grade point average.

President’s List

A full-time student who in any Fall or Spring semester earns a grade point average of at least 3.8 with no grade below a “C” will be placed on the President’s List. This recognition is noted on the student’s academic transcript.

Dean’s List

A full-time student who in any Fall or Spring semester earns a grade point average of at least 3.25 with no grade below a “C” will be placed on the Dean’s List. This recognition is noted on the student’s academic transcript.

Phi Theta Kappa

This organization is the international honor society for the two-year college. A student who has completed twelve (12) semester hours (not including developmental courses) at Richard Bland College and achieved a minimum grade point average of 3.50 is eligible for membership. Richard Bland College’s chapter, Alpha Beta Omicron, was chartered in 1971 and is active in both college and community service.

Graduation Honors

Recognition is given at Commencement to students who have excelled in academic work. The minimum cumulative grade point averages required for graduation honors are:

  • Cum Laude: 3.25 GPA
  • Magna Cum Laude: 3.50 GPA
  • Summa Cum Laude: 3.80 GPA

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Academic Status

Richard Bland College has three levels of academic status for its students: Good Standing, Academic Probation, and Academic Suspension. In order to continue in college, a student should normally maintain at least a 2.0 grade point average on all work attempted. If the grade point average is deficient, the student should be able to remove the deficiency within two semesters of full-time study in order to achieve the minimum 2.0 grade point average required for graduation.

Good Standing

To continue in Good Standing, a student must meet or exceed the following minimum academic requirements:

  • At the end of the first semester (9-11 semester hours minimum, including developmental hours), the student must have attained a grade point average of 1.25
  • At the end of the first semester (12 semester hours minimum, including developmental hours), the student must have attained a grade point average of 1.50
  • At the end of the second semester (24 semester hours minimum, including developmental hours), the student must have attained a cumulative grade point average of 1.75
  • At the completion of 45 semester hours (not including developmental hours), the student must maintain a cumulative grade point average of 2.0
Academic Probation

A student who has not met the minimum academic requirements in the preceding semester to maintain Good Standing will be placed on Academic Probation. The student will be notified of this action by a letter from the Dean of Enrollment Services. A student on Academic Probation must meet the following conditions during the probation semester:

  • The student’s academic load may not exceed thirteen semester hours except by permission of the Dean of Faculty.
  • The student must earn at least a 2.00 grade point average for the semester while on academic probation, or meet the requirements of Good Standing.

A student in violation of either of these two conditions will be subject to academic suspension from the College. At the end of the probation semester (or completion of 12 academic hours), the student may be:

  • Returned to Good Standing if the student has met the conditions of the probation semester and earned sufficient quality points, or
  • Continued on Academic Probation if the student has met the conditions of the probation semester, but has not earned sufficient quality points to regain Good Standing. In such case, the student will be allowed to continue in college, but only on continued Academic Probation. If Good Standing is not regained at the end of the second semester of Academic Probation, the student will be placed on Academic Suspension if the student has not met the conditions of the first probation semester. (See Academic Suspension) The student will be notified of such status by a letter from the Dean of Enrollment Services.

A student admitted to Richard Bland College under Academic Probation from another college or university is subject to the same requirements as continuing Richard Bland College students under Academic Probation.

Academic Suspension

A student placed on Academic Suspension is required to withdraw from the College for a minimum period of one semester. A student will be placed directly on Academic Suspension at the end of nine (9) hours attempted if the cumulative grade point average is below .50. Students placed on Academic Probation may be subject to Academic Suspension after one semester if the grade point average is not appropriate for the total number of credit hours attempted (See Academic Status – Good Standing). A student will be notified of Academic Suspension by a letter from the Dean of Enrollment Services. A student who is on Academic Suspension from RBC or any other college is not permitted to enroll in any program of the College for one full semester after suspension. If a student on Academic Suspension wishes to return to Richard Bland College, an application for readmission must be completed and forwarded to the Admission Office. Academic status (Good Standing or Academic Probation) will be determined at the time the student is readmitted. A student who has been suspended for a second time from Richard Bland College or from any other institution of higher education may not be considered for readmission/admission.

If a Richard Bland College student is suspended at the end of the spring semester and is pre-registered for a course during the Intersession (short term immediately following the Spring semester), the student will be permitted to complete that term and will receive credit for the course(s). However, the student will not be permitted to enroll in additional classes until the upcoming Spring semester. Pre- registration for any other Summer term following the Spring suspension will be terminated and tuition refunds will be issued. Credits earned while under suspension from this or any other college will not be accepted by Richard Bland College.


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Academic Amnesty

Although all credits and grades earned at Richard Bland College are a part of the permanent record, a student may petition through the Office of the Dean of Faculty for forgiveness of part or all of the academic record. This amnesty policy is a privilege extended to students who began their academic careers at Richard Bland College, or at any other college, and for whatever reasons experienced academic difficulty. Academic amnesty may be granted to students who have had at least a five-year interruption in college education, and upon re-enrollment in Richard Bland College, have established a satisfactory record.

To be forgiven, those courses in which a “D” or “F” was earned at Richard Bland College, the student must first complete an equivalent of twelve (12) semester credits and then petition the Dean of Faculty in writing. The Dean of Faculty will determine if there is sufficient evidence to consider that the student is better able to succeed academically. After being granted amnesty, the student will retain credit and quality points for courses taken at Richard Bland College in which at least a “C” is earned. Courses for which academic amnesty have been granted will indicate “Amnesty” on the student’s transcript. The cumulative grade point average will not include the hours attempted and quality points earned (if any) for those courses. Eligibility for academic honors, however, is determined on the basis of the student’s entire academic record. If the student is a previous recipient of federal financial aid and is determined to be ineligible for financial aid because of not meeting Satisfactory Academic Progress guidelines as mandated by the federal government, the ability to receive financial assistance may not be granted until the student has completed a semester and has satisfactory grades meeting the requirements.


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Challenging Academic Records

All course grades and changes in academic status become part of the student’s permanent record. If a student wishes to challenge a change in status to Academic Probation or to Academic Suspension, the student may petition for a hearing before the Academic Standards & Appeals Committee. Such a petition should be requested through the online SAP/Academic Progress Appeal Form for Reinstatement. It may be that sufficient personal circumstances exist, not reflected in the mathematically derived grade point average, to warrant the Committee’s waiving certain academic requirements in a given case or recalculating the student’s grade point average.

The Academic Standards & Appeals Committee will hear the student and any concerned faculty member in order to reach its decision. The recommendation of the Committee will be reported to the Dean of Faculty, who will make the final decision and notify the student. The Committee is not authorized to change a grade.


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Academic Assessment

Academic programs and support services are evaluated to ensure their quality. Occasionally, students are surveyed to obtain information on their satisfaction with faculty and staff. Faculty members are evaluated on teaching methodologies and effectiveness each semester. Students are surveyed upon graduation to measure their satisfaction with the College. The results of this process are used internally and are reported to the State Council of Higher Education in Virginia and the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools periodically. All data collected for assessment is held under strict confidence and is never used to evaluate or identify individual student performance.


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Attendance Policy

Regular and punctual class attendance is expected of all students. Each student is allowed absences without penalty for the number of hours equal to the credit hours for a course. For example, a student is allowed three (3) hours of absence from a three (3) credit hour class. It is the responsibility of the student to make up missed work for such absences; and being absent does not excuse a student from the responsibility to complete any work or assignment on time.

In addition to absences without penalty, in recognition of special circumstances (e.g., family or medical emergency, official school business, military obligation, bereavement, religious observance, etc.), the instructor and the Dean of Faculty may excuse absence from class. Whenever possible (e.g. military obligation), the student must notify the instructor of the planned absence in advance. Valid written documentation must be submitted to the instructor to excuse class absences within five (5) weekdays. Class excuses are not granted for transportation problems or athletic practices.

College officials responsible for a student representing the College on officially approved trips must notify the student’s instructors in advance. An instructor so notified must not penalize the student, although the student is responsible for material missed.

Instructors are expected to include the class attendance policy in the course syllabus issued to the students. They are required to maintain attendance records on all students and, at the request of the Dean of Faculty or the Registrar, to report any student who exceeds the maximum number of unexcused absences as established by the instructor. A student who exceeds the maximum number of unexcused absences may receive academic penalty in the course at the discretion of the instructor or be administratively withdrawn at the discretion of the Dean of Faculty.


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Audit/Credit Status

A student may register for a course on an “audit” status. Audit students are charged the regular rate of tuition and fees, and an audit class is counted as part of the student’s semester course.

load. However, a student registered on audit status is not required to take tests or final examinations. Failure to attend classes regularly may jeopardize audit status. A student enrolled on audit status is not given a final grade, but the permanent record is marked (O) to indicate Audit. Audit is recorded without certification of class attendance or course accomplishment.

A change in registration from Credit to Audit or Audit to Credit must be completed by the end of the first week of classes for fall and spring semesters and prior to the first class meeting for summer terms. (See the Academic Calendar for the pertinent dates.) In each case, the student must complete the appropriate form at the Registrar’s Office.

Credit cannot be given for a course taken on audit status beyond the Class Change period or after the course has been completed. However, a student who has audited a course may later enroll in the same course on a credit status.

It is the responsibility of each student to determine the effect of auditing a class on financial aid, insurance policies, and participating in clubs and organizations.


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Traditional Student

  • First Year – The student who has completed fewer than 24 semester hour credits or has earned fewer than 48 quality points
  • Sophomore – The student who has completed at least 24 semester hour credits and has earned at least 48 quality points 


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Non-Degree Student

Students enrolled as non-degree may take no more than nine (9) hours of coursework per semester for a maximum of 18 hours, after which they must seek admission as traditional degree- seeking students. Students enrolled under the non-degree category are not eligible for financial aid. Students must complete all required forms, pay the standard one-time application fee, and all applicable tuition and fees. Students enrolled in teacher recertification courses must provide proof of employment to the Registrar. Continued enrollment as a non-degree student is contingent upon satisfactory academic status.

Students in the category are identified as:

  • Students who, at the time they enroll, do not wish to pursue a degree program but do wish to receive credit for coursework taken on campus, off campus, or during summer sessions or
  • Students enrolled in teacher recertification courses, courses required for employment, or courses taken for personal enrichment

Students falling under this definition must meet the following requirements:

  • Students must be at least 17 years of age
  • Students must have a valid high school diploma or GED Graduation Application

Students must complete the Application for Candidacy for Degree, available in the Registrar’s Office, by the first week in February for May graduation, mid-July for August graduation, and mid-November for December graduation. (See the Academic Calendar for specific filing deadlines.)

Students who will be candidates for degrees are encouraged to check with the Registrar or their advisors regarding academic standing prior to the deadline for filing for degrees. Candidates

for December and May degrees are expected to participate in commencement in May. Candidates for degrees in August may participate in May commencement if they file by mid-February, have a 2.0 overall cumulative grade point average at the time of filing, and have completed all degree requirements by the end of the Summer Session and have registered for the required summer courses prior to the May Commencement. Candidates may not exceed 12 credit hours to complete the Associate Degree during the summer. Students who file for August graduation and do not have a 2.0 overall cumulative grade point average at the end of the spring semester are not permitted to participate in Commencement.

The diploma will not be released if a student has an outstanding debt to the College.


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Second Associate Degree

Richard Bland College does not confer two degrees concurrently. A student who has already received an Associate Degree may earn a second but different Associate Degree by meeting the following requirements:

  • Completing a minimum of 15 semester hours of additional course work during the semester in which the requirements for the second Associate Degree are met at Richard Bland College, after the date on which the first degree was earned,
  • Meeting all prerequisite and course requirements for the first Associate Degree, as well as degree requirements for the second degree, and
  • Earning a grade point average of 2.0 or higher in course work completed for the first and second Associate Degree.

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Examinations

All non-activity courses will have scheduled final examinations. Unless otherwise announced by the instructor, the examination will take place in the same classroom in which the course has been held. Students are required to take all examinations at the time scheduled. No changes will be permitted except when:

  • Two or more examinations are scheduled at the same hour or
  • A student has three or more consecutive examinations. (In this case, the student must take all examinations during examination week.)

Written requests to reschedule examinations must be submitted to the instructor for approval. An excuse for missing an examination for illness will not be accepted without a physician’s note and notification in advance whenever possible. No student will be allowed more than three hours for an examination, unless a documented ADA accommodation is involved.


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Grade Appeals

In matters involving grade appeals, the student should consult with the faculty member who issued the final grade for the course. If the student still believes a grade has been assigned unfairly, the student may appeal to the division chair and further to the Dean of Faculty. If the issue cannot be resolved at any of these levels, the student has the right to appeal formally to the Academic Standards & Appeals Committee. This written appeal must be submitted within ninety days of issuance of the student’s final grade. A form for facilitating the appeal process is available in the Office of the Dean of Faculty.

It shall be the responsibility of the Academic Standards & Appeals Committee to hear the student’s appeal and to interview anyone the student chooses to speak on his/her behalf. The faculty member issuing the grade also has the right to appear before the Committee for the purpose of presenting pertinent information and also may have witnesses present if desired. The recommendation of the Committee will be reported to the Dean of Faculty, who will make the final decision and notify the student. The Committee is not empowered to change a grade.

In these proceedings, the burden of proof is on the student to prove that a change of grade is the appropriate action.


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Quality Points (QPA)

Final semester grades are given quality-point ratings in accordance with the following scale:

  • A = 4 quality points per semester-hour credit
  • B = 3 quality points per semester-hour credit
  • C = 2 quality points per semester-hour credit
  • D = 1 quality points per semester-hour credit
  • F = 0 quality points per semester-hour credit

To determine the quality points earned in a given course, multiply the points for the final grade by the semester-hour credit for that course.

A student’s quality-point average (QPA or GPA) is computed by dividing the number of quality points earned at RBC by the number of credits attempted at RBC. This computation includes semester hours in which a grade of “F” is earned. If a course is repeated, the highest grade is used to compute the quality-point average; however, both the original and second grades are recorded on the student’s permanent record. The grades of accepted transfer courses, audit courses, developmental courses, and courses officially dropped before the academic penalty date are not included in the quality-point average.


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Registration Procedures

Online registration procedures are on the Richard Bland College website and in the course schedule for each semester and summer session. An Alternate PIN is required for registration, and is available only from the advisor/faculty member to whom the student has been assigned.

Students should make appointments with their Learner Mentor as soon as possible after course schedules are published to plan schedules and review degree requirements. Faculty office schedules are posted on respective faculty office doors. Faculty office telephone numbers may be obtained by referring to the College website.

Registration stations are located in the CSA building. Students may also register with their Learner Mentor.


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Repeat of Courses

Students are limited to two attempts in the same course. After the second attempt, further attempts require completion and submission of the Class Repeat Application to the Registrar’s Office. The application is available at the Registrar’s Office in the CSA building on campus and on the Records and Registration link of the RBC website at http://www.rbc.edu/administrative- offices/office-of-the-registrar/forms/

Repeat courses may impact your financial aid; please contact the financial aid office for more details.

All original courses and grades will appear on the student’s transcript. Although Richard Bland College adjusts cumulative grade point averages for successful repeats, some four-year institutions may compute the grade point average using all courses attempted.

Note: The following examples illustrate the rules concerning repeats:

  • Original grade is “I” (Incomplete) and the student registers for the same course the following semester. The original course will remain on the student’s record but will be dropped without academic penalty and the new course will not be shown as a repeat on the student’s record.
  • Original grade is lower than the grade for the repeated course: The cumulative grade point average is calculated including “I” (located in the column to the right of the course). The attempted hours and quality points earned for the repeated course and the attempted hours and quality points earned (if any) for the original course are excluded “E” (located in the column to the right of the course).
  • Original grade is equal to or higher than the grade for the repeated course: (See rule concerning “F’s” below.) The cumulative grade point average is calculated including “I” (located in the column to the right of the course) the attempted hours and quality points earned for the original course and excluding “E” (located in the column to the right of the course) the attempted hours and quality points (if any) for the repeated course.
  • Original grade is “F” and the grade for the new course is “F”: The cumulative grade point average is calculated including “I” (located in the column to the right of the course) the attempted hours for up to three (3) “F’s” for a course.
  • Original and second grades are “F’s” and the grade for the new course is “D” or higher: The cumulative grade point average is calculated including “I” (located in the column to the right of the course) the attempted hours and quality points earned for the new course and the attempted hours for the two “F’s” are excluded “E” (located in the column to the right of the course).
  • Original, second, and third grades are “F’s”: On occasion a student must complete the course to fulfill degree requirements. Therefore, a third repeat is warranted. If a third repeat is granted by the Dean of Faculty and the course is passed, the cumulative grade point average is calculated including “I” the attempted hours for the three “F’s” and the attempted hours and quality points earned for the new course.

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Credit Hour Load (Student)

To enhance the opportunity for early success, students admitted to the College under probationary status must enroll in the following prescribed list of courses during their first semester or until they have successfully completed all developmental courses (earned a C or better).

The general full-time student credit load during the regular session consists of four or five courses representing a minimum of twelve (12) and a maximum of eighteen (18) semester-hour credits. Exceptions to this general credit load include the following:

  • A student may, with the approval of the Dean of Faculty, carry an overload beyond eighteen semester credit hours.
  • A continuing student on Academic Probation may not exceed thirteen semester credit hours.
  • The maximum summer session credit load is two courses or six credit hours in each term. Students may earn up to fifteen credits during the summer.

For administrative purposes, a student who is enrolled in twelve or more credit hours is considered a full-time student. A student enrolled in fewer than twelve credit hours is considered part-time.


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Grading System

Grades can be accessed by the students through Banner Web at the end of each semester or term. The College’s grading system for evaluating achievement in academic courses is:

  • A = Superior (90-100)
  • B = Good (80-89)
  • C = Average (70-79)
  • D = Poor (60-69)
  • F = Failing (<60)
  • W = Withdrew
  • W/F = Withdrew/Failing
  • M = Drop without Academic Penalty

In addition to the grades, A, B, C, D, and F, the following symbols are also used:

  • The grade of “I” (Incomplete) indicates the student has received permission from the instructor to postpone the completion of certain required work or for a deferred final examination. The student and instructor must complete the “Application for Incomplete Grade” to initiate the process. Incomplete course work and deferred examinations must be completed as soon as possible, but not later than the last date to complete “Incomplete” grades during the following semester (See Academic Calendar for pertinent dates). An incomplete grade that is not removed within this period will automatically become an “F”. A student may elect to repeat an “Incomplete” course the following semester. If so, the “Incomplete” course will remain on the student’s record but will be dropped without academic penalty.
  • The symbol of “W” (Withdrew on or before Penalty Drop Date) indicates a course dropped after the Class Change period, but on or before the penalty drop date (See Academic Calendar for pertinent dates). Any student withdrawing after the Penalty Drop Date receives a grade of “W/F”. Grades of “W/F” are included as an “F” in the computation of a student’s Richard Bland College grade point average.
  • The symbol of “M” (Medical/Extenuating Circumstance Withdrawal) indicates a course dropped after the penalty drop date due to medical/extenuating circumstances with appropriate documentation. Approval of the Dean of Faculty is required.
  • The symbol of “O” (Audit) indicates a course being taken for non-credit.

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Withdrawal from Richard Bland College

Students who desire to withdraw from the College must complete a “Withdrawal from College” form available from the Office of the Registrar or submit a letter to the Registrar stating the desire to withdraw. Students under the age of eighteen must furnish written permission from their parent or guardian to withdraw from the College. Students with outstanding debts to the College must settle their accounts before withdrawing.

If a student withdraws from the College after the penalty drop date (see Academic Calendar for pertinent dates) or does not officially withdraw by notifying the Office of the Registrar in writing, a grade of “F” will be assigned for each course. If extenuating circumstances exist, the Dean of Faculty must be informed in writing and appropriate documentation may be required.

The Dean of Faculty will determine if withdrawal without academic penalty is appropriate.

Refunds will be based on guidelines outlined in the Course Schedule on the website at www.rbc.edu.

Readmission to Richard Bland College after voluntary official withdrawal is not automatic. A student desiring to return to the College must apply for readmission.

Military Deployment

A student with certain military status who is called to active duty is given special consideration by the College in determining tuition refund or academic deferral of credit. Depending upon the circumstances and timing, such a student may be allowed to withdraw from the College without academic penalty and with full refund of tuition or the student will receive a grade of incomplete with the option of completing the course(s) at a later date or tuition credit for future enrollment.

Each case is determined on its own merits based on the College’s receipt of a copy of the appropriate military orders.

Withdrawing from One or More Classes (Dropping a Class)

After the conclusion of the Class Change period during the first week of classes, class drops are initiated by completing a “Class Drop” form available at the Office of the Registrar or on the Registrar’s page of the College’s website (www.rbc.edu). The form must be signed by the student and the Financial Aid Office (if applicable), and submitted to the Office of the Registrar.

A course dropped after the Class Change period but before the Penalty Drop Date (approximately mid-semester) will have the notation “W” on the student’s permanent record.

A course dropped after the Penalty Drop Date receives a grade of “W/F” (included in the computation of the student’s Richard Bland College grade point average). If medical or extenuating circumstances exist, and appropriate documentation can be presented to and approved by the Dean of Faculty, the grade of “M” (drop without academic penalty) will be assigned to the student’s permanent record. Please refer to the section concerning the College’s grading system.


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Institutional Review Board (IRB)

According to 45 CFR 46 of the Code of Federal Regulations, The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has mandated that research which occurs at an institution and which involves human subjects must be approved by an Institutional Review Board (IRB) to ensure the safety and the appropriate use of humans as subjects in research studies.  All protocols involving human subjects must be submitted to the Protection of Human Subjects Committee at Richard Bland College, which serves as the College’s IRB.

Based upon the guidelines provided by the DHHS, the RBC Protection of Human Subjects Committee will either 1) exempt the protocol from formal review or require that it undergo either 2) expedited review by the Chair, and typically, selected members of the committee, or 3) review by the full committee during a convened meeting.

A properly completed protocol will include a brief rationale for the study, full procedures, description of the participants, copy of all tests, questionnaires, all interview questions, the informed consent form, and other pertinent information.  Normal review times are three to four weeks for an expedited  review, and more than one month for a full review, provided all the necessary detailed information has been included in the submission.  If approved, human subjects protocols are valid for a term of one year.  Projects which continue beyond the expiration date of the approval must submit a new protocol stating that the project is continuing, and all deviations from the original protocol should be modified in the new protocol submission.

Once submitted for committee review, every protocol undergoes a thorough review.  A notice of approval will be sent electronically to the principal investigator(s) of record.


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Programs and Courses

Richard Bland College provides a sound liberal arts education designed for transfer to 4-year colleges and universities. The Board of Visitors of The College of William & Mary has authorized Richard Bland College to confer the degrees of Associate in Arts and Associate in Science. Each degree consists of specific requirements plus electives.

Curriculum Goals

The following college-wide curriculum goals have been adopted. Upon graduation from Richard Bland College, the student will have acquired:

  • The ability to analyze and critique information through accurate reading, listening, and logical thinking, and the ability to acquire, organize, document, and present written and oral information clearly, precisely, and correctly
  • The ability to acquire, process, understand, and use quantitative data
  • An understanding of how major historical factors and events have influenced the development of civilization
  • An understanding of major natural laws and theories that govern our universe and the ability to apply the scientific method to the acquisition of knowledge and problem-solving
  • An understanding of major social forces that have shaped and continue to shape contemporary society
  • An understanding of the human experience as revealed through creative expressions from the humanities
  • An understanding of the components of a healthful lifestyle, including the benefits of physical fitness

Richard Bland College strives to maintain an intellectual, cultural, and physical environment that fosters integrity of character, the spirit of free inquiry, disciplined thinking, and the capacity for lifelong learning. The College is committed to a flexible, balanced, and coherent course of study based on a core curriculum in the humanities, natural sciences, social sciences, and physical education.

Receiving an Associate Degree from Richard Bland College allows students to pursue bachelor’s programs in fields ranging from the arts to technology, from languages to laboratory research. The liberal arts foundation in the Richard Bland College curriculum has also provided the impetus for development of program-to-program articulation agreements with many 4-year institutions in the areas of business, education, and health sciences, including options in such fields as accounting, elementary school teaching, and nursing. Students interested in exploring major programs should meet with their assigned Learner Mentor or the Dean of Faculty.


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General Policies

The term “Continuous Course” (such as English 101-102) indicates the two semesters of the year-long course are meant to be taken as a unit, and the satisfactory completion of the first semester is a prerequisite for entrance into the second semester, except by special permission of the instructor.   A single number (such as Philosophy 101) indicates the course is completed within a single semester.

Courses listed in this Catalog have been approved by the College; however, a course will be taught only if there is sufficient enrollment, which will be determined by the Dean of Faculty.

Physical Education credits may not be used to fulfill requirements in any academic area. Only one class (2 credits) in physical education will apply toward graduation requirements. Students are nonetheless welcome to enroll in additional physical education courses and have no more than two additional credits applied as electives toward graduation. Non-credit (developmental or audit) courses do not fulfill academic requirements for graduation.

A minimum overall cumulative grade point average of 2.0 is required for graduation in any degree program offered by Richard Bland College. At least 30 of the total semester hours required for a degree must be earned at Richard Bland College. Nine of the last fifteen hours must be earned in residency at Richard Bland College to satisfy degree requirements. Only in exceptional cases will the Dean of Faculty exempt a student from any graduation requirement outlined in this Catalog.

It is the student’s responsibility to know and fulfill the requirements for graduation and to check with the Registrar during the year of intended graduation to be certain all credentials are in order.

Students planning to transfer to The College of William & Mary, as well as to certain other institutions in the Commonwealth of Virginia, should remember that six hours of foreign language at the intermediate level are required for graduation. Students should refer to the Transfer Guide to review the appropriate articulation agreement. This information is available on the Richard Bland College website.

Any course that has been used to fulfill a degree requirement in one area may not be used to fulfill a requirement in any other area.

All General Education Core requirements will be met within the requirements of the General Associate Degree and in all degrees with Areas of Emphasis.


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The General Education Core

The General Education Core provides the fundamentals of liberal arts education. It is the foundation of the Associate in Arts (“A.A.”) and the Associate in Science (“A.S.”) degrees. The General Education Core is constituted of courses that are accepted toward general education requirements at most of Virginia’s 4-year colleges and universities.

The General Education Core credit hour requirements applicable to the Associate in Arts Degree and the Associate in Science Degree are listed below. All students must meet the core requirements. The Core Courses listed below identifies those RBC courses that fulfill core requirements for the degree.

CourseCredit Hours
The Art of Language and Ideas
ENGL 101-102 6
Choose one course from this area3
The Language and History of Fine Arts
Choose one course from this area3
The Human Experience
Choose one course from this area3
U.S. and World Cultures
Choose one course from this area3
Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning
Choose one course from this area3
Investigation of the Natural World
Choose one course from this area4
Computer Proficiency0-3

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Core Courses List

Courses with an asterisk (*) can be used to satisfy the requirement of only one category. Courses in italics are only transferable in some cases, and you must exercise caution.

Note: For the A.A. Degree, two semesters of foreign language are required to complete the degree requirements. For the A.S. Degree, the foreign language classes are all considered electives (none required).

The Art of Language and Ideas
ENGL 101 Writing and Research
ENGL 102 Introduction to Literary Genres
ENGL 200 The Craft of Researched Writing
ENGL 201 Western World Literature
ENGL 202 Western World Literature
ENGL 203 English Literature through the 18th Century
ENGL 204 English Literature: Romanticism to Present
ENGL 205 American Literature through the Civil War
ENGL 206 American Literature: Civil War to Present
ENGL 210 Shakespeare
ENGL 211 Contemporary Literature
ENGL 212 Fantasy: Beowulf to the Present
ENGL 213 Science Fiction
ENGL 214 African-American Literature
PHIL 101 Introduction to Philosophy*
PHIL 203 Introduction to Ethics*
PHIL 270 Asian Religious Thought
REL 201 Introduction to Religion*
REL 209 Comparative Religion*
REL 210 Social History of Christianity*
REL 270 Asian Religious Thought
COMM 101 Public Speaking
COMM 201 Interpersonal Communication

The Language and History of the Fine Arts
ART 201 Art History Survey I
ART 202 Art History Survey II
ART 231 Art Appreciation
MUS 103 Music Appreciation
THEA 201 Theatre: A Contemporary and Historical Introduction

The Human Experience
PHIL 101 Introduction to Philosophy*
PHIL 201 Ancient and Medieval Philosophy
PHIL 202 Modern Philosophy
PHIL 203 Introduction to Ethics*
REL 201 Introduction to Religion*
PSY 201- 202 General Psychology or PSY 240 Introduction to Counseling
PSY 250 Developmental Psychology
PSY 260 Psychology of Personality Theories
PSY 291 Psychology of Adjustment
PSY 292 Stress Management
PSY 295 Human Sexuality
REL 201 Introduction to Religion*
REL 209 Comparative Religion*
REL 210 Social History of Christianity*
REL 270 Asian Religious Thought
SOC 201 General Sociology
SOC 204 Social Problems
SOC 250 Criminology
SOC 253 Marriage and the Family

Foreign Language
FREN 101-102 Elementary French I, II
FREN 201-202 Intermediate French I, II
SPAN 101-102 Elementary Spanish I, II
SPAN 201-202 Intermediate Spanish I, II

U.S. and World Cultures
ECON 201 Principles of Economics (Macro)
ECON 202 Principles of Economics (Micro)
GEO 101 Major World Regions
GEO 103 Cultural Geography
GOVT 201 American Government and Politics
GOVT 202 The United States in World Affairs
GOVT 203 Comparative Government and Politics
HIST 101 Western Civilization to 1715
HIST 102 Western Civilization since 1715
HIST 201 American History to 1865
HIST 202 American History since 1865
HIST 240 Nazi Germany
HIST 250 Modern America: U.S. History since 1945
HIST 270 The History of Modern Britain
HIST 276 The Vietnam War
PHIL 270 Asian Religious Thought
REL 209 Comparative Religion*
REL 210 Social History of Christianity*
REL 219 History and Religion of Israel
REL 220 New Testament World
REL 254 Religion in Contemporary America
REL 270 Asian Religious Though

Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning
CSCI 202 Computer Applications I
CSCI 203 Computer Applications II
CSCI 221 Programming for Computer Science & Engineering Majors I
CSCI 222 Programming for Computer Science & Engineering Majors II
MATH 110 Contemporary Mathematics
MATH 121 College Algebra
MATH 151 Pre-Calculus
MATH 200 Calculus for Business and Social Science
MATH 217 Introductory Statistics
MATH 224 Elementary Linear Algebra
MATH 251-252 Calculus I-II
MATH 261 Multivariable Calculus
MATH 271 Differential Equations
Investigation of the Natural World
BIO 101-102 (101L-102L) General Biology
BIO 151-152 (151L-152L) Biological Science
BIO 205-206 Human Anatomy and Physiology
BIO 108 (108L) Introduction to Ecology
BIO 211 Microbiology
BIO 220 Medical Microbiology
CHEM 101-102 (101L-102L) General Chemistry
CHEM 110 Concepts of Chemistry
CHEM 230-231 Organic Chemistry
PHYS 101-102 College Physics
PHYS 201-202 University Physics Computer Proficiency

Computer Proficiency
Students must either pass the Computer Proficiency Assessment or take one of the following courses:
CSCI 202 Computer Applications I
CSCI 203 Computer Applications II
CSCI 221 Programming for Computer Science & Engineering Majors I
CSCI 222 Programming for Computer Science & Engineering Majors II


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Associate in Arts Degree (A.A.)

The Associate in Arts Degree is designed primarily for those students who plan to complete their baccalaureate degrees in areas of the arts, humanities, or the behavioral and social sciences. Depending upon the institution to which a student may transfer and the prospective major, the Associate in Science Degree may be more appropriate. Students are urged to consult an academic advisor on this matter.

A student must meet the following credit-hour requirements for the Associate in Arts Degree:

GENERAL ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE

The College offers a traditional generalist degree incorporating the Core and significant breadth across discipline.

COURSECREDIT HOURS
The Art of Language and Ideas
ENGL 101-1026
Choose two additional courses from this area6
The Language and History of Fine Arts
Choose one course from this area3
The Human Experience
Choose two courses from this area6
U.S. and World Cultures
Choose three courses from this area, at least one of which must be in History9
Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning
Choose one course from this area3-4
Investigation of the Natural World
Choose one laboratory course from this area4
Foreign Language
Two courses from this area6-8
Computer Proficiency0-3
Electives or11-17
Foreign Language 101-102 if needed + electives8 + (9 to 11)
Total60

In deciding upon elective courses, students working closely with their academic advisors should consult the transfer path for their intended transfer college and program. Bear in mind that some colleges or programs may require or recommend more courses in a particular area (math, science, or foreign languages, for example) than are required for the A.A. degree at Richard Bland College. Those courses should be included in the electives taken as part of your academic plan at RBC. No more than 3 credits of PE may count toward graduation.


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Associate in Arts Degree Communications - (A.A - Communication) (Pending SCHEV approval)

The Associate in Arts Degree is designed primarily for those students who plan to complete their baccalaureate degrees in areas of the arts, humanities, or the behavioral and social sciences. Depending upon the institution to which a student may transfer and the prospective major, the Associate in Science Degree may be more appropriate. Students are urged to consult an academic advisor on this matter.
A student must meet the following credit-hour requirements for the Associate in Arts Degree.

GENERAL ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE

The College offers a traditional generalist degree incorporating the Core and significant breadth across discipline.

CourseCredit Hours
Communication
Specialization: COMM 101, 102, and 2019
The Art of Language and Ideas
ENGL 101-1026
The Language and History of Fine Arts
Choose one course from this area3
The Human Experience
Choose two courses from this area6
U.S. and World Cultures
Choose three courses from this area, at least one of which must be in History9
Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning
Choose one course from this area3-4
Investigation of the Natural World
Choose one laboratory course from this area4
Foreign Language
Choose two courses from this area6-8
Computer Proficiency0-3
Electives or8-14
Foreign Language 101-102 if needed + electives. Additional Communication courses are recommended.8+ (6 to 8)
Total60

In deciding upon elective courses, students working closely with their academic advisors should consult the transfer path for their intended transfer college and program. Bear in mind that some colleges or programs may require or recommend more courses in a particular area (math, science, or foreign languages, for example) than are required for the A.A. degree at Richard Bland College. Those courses should be included in the electives taken as part of your academic plan at RBC. No more than 3 credits of PE may count toward graduation.


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Associate in Science Degree (A.S.)

The Associate in Science Degree is designed primarily for those students who plan to complete their baccalaureate degrees in areas of education, business, health professions, social work, engineering, or one of the natural sciences. Depending upon the institution to which a student may transfer and the prospective major, the Associate in Arts Degree may be more appropriate. Students are urged to consult an academic advisor on this matter. There is no foreign language requirement to earn this degree.

A student must meet the following credit-hour requirements for the Associate in Science Degree.

GENERAL ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE DEGREE

The College offers a traditional generalist degree incorporating the Core and significant breadth across discipline.

COURSECREDIT HOURS
The Art of Language and Ideas
ENGL 101-1026
Choose one course from this area3
The Language and History of Fine Arts
Choose one course from this area3
The Human Experience
Choose three courses from this area9
Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning
Choose two courses from this area6
US & World Cultures
Choose three courses from this area9
Investigation of the Natural World
Choose two laboratory courses from this area8
Computer Proficiency0-3
Electives
(Foreign Language: it is recommended that students check with their desired transfer institution to determine their foreign language requirements.)14-17
Total60

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Associate in Science Degree - Behavioral Sciences (A.S.-Behavioral Science)

COURSECREDIT HOURS
The Art of Language and Ideas
ENGL 101-102, COMM 1019
The Language and History of Fine Arts
ART 201, 202, 231, MUS 103, or THEA 2013
The Human Experience
PSY 201-202, 250, 217, PHIL 203, SOC 201 or 204, 25321
U.S. and World Cultures
ECON 201, 202, GEO 101, 103, GOVT 201, 202, 203, HIST 101, 102, 201, 202, 240, 250, 270, 276, or REL 209, 210, 219, 220, 2546
Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning
MATH 121, 2176
Investigation of the Natural World
BIO 101-102 (101L, 102L), CHEM 101-102 (101L,102L), or BIO 101 (101L), CHEM 101 (101L)8
Computer Proficiency
CSCI 202, 203, 221, 222 or pass the Computer Proficiency Assessment3
Electives
PSY 240, 241, 260, 291, 292, 295 SOC 250, PE 1214-6
(Foreign Language: it is recommended that students check with their desired transfer institution to determine their foreign language requirements.)
Total60

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Associate in Science Degree - Business Administration (A.S.-Business Administration)

COURSECREDIT HOURS
Business
BUS 201-2026
The Art of Language and Ideas
ENGL 101-102 6
ENGL 200, 201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 210, 211, 212, 213, or 214 PHIL 101, 121, 201, 202, 203, or 270
REL 201, COMM 101, 201 (Those planning to pursue Pharmacy should take COMM 101
3
The Language and History of Fine Arts
ART 201, 202, 231, MUS 103, or THEA 2013
The Human Experience
PHIL 101, 203, PSY 201-202, 210, 250, 260, 291, 292, 295 REL 201, 209, 210, SOC 201, 204, 250, 2539
U.S. and World Cultures
ECON 201-202 Both are required, choose one additional course from the following:6
GEO 101, 103, GOVT 201, 202, 203, HIST 101, 102, 201, 202, 240, 250, 270, 276 REL 209, 210, 219, 220, 2543
Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning
MATH 217, 200, 2516-7
Investigation of the Natural World
BIO 101-102 (101L, 102L), 151-152 (151L, 152L), 205-206, 211, 220 CHEM 101-102 (101L,102L), 230-231, 110 (110L)4
BIO 108, PHYS 101-102, 201-202
CSCI 202, 203, 221, 222 or pass the Computer Proficiency Assessment3
Electives
BUS 104 is recommended for those unfamiliar with the various business careers (Foreign Language: it is recommended that students check with their desired transfer institution to determine their foreign language requirements.)11-14
Total60

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Associate in Science Degree – Math/Computer Science (A.S.-Math/Computer Science)

COURSECREDIT HOURS
The Art of Language and Ideas
ENGL 101-102 6
ENGL 200, 201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 210, 211, 212, 213, or 214 PHIL 101, 121, 201, 202, 203, or 270
REL 201, COMM 101, 201 (Those planning to pursue Pharmacy should take COMM 101)
3
The Language and History of Fine Arts
ART 201, 202, 231, MUS 103, or THEA 2013
The Human Experience
PHIL 101, 203, PSY 201-202, 210, 250, 260, 291, 292, 295 REL 201, 209, 210, SOC 201, 204, 250, 2533
U.S. and World Cultures
ECON 201-202, GEO 101, 103, GOVT 201, 202, 203 HIST 101, 102, 201, 202, 240, 250, 270, 276 REL 209, 210, 219, 220, 2543
Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning
MATH 251, 252, 26111
CSCI 2213
MATH 224 or CSCI 222 (For Mathematics majors take MATH 224, for Computer Science majors take CSCI 222)3
Investigation of the Natural World
PHYS 201-2028
Electives
Recommended electives (3-6) in Math: MATH 261, MATH 271 Recommended electives (4-12) from the Natural Sciences (Mathematics and Computer Science majors are often required to take one to three additional Natural Science courses. It is recommended that students check with their desired transfer institution to determine the specific natural science courses required. (No more than two additional PE credit hours may be taken for elective credit.) (Foreign Language: it is recommended that students check with their desired transfer institution to determine their foreign language requirements.)15
Total60

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Associate in Science Degree – Physical Science (A.S.-Physical Science)

COURSECREDIT HOURS
The Art of Language and Ideas
ENGL 101-102 6
ENGL 200, 201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 210, 211, 212, 213, or 214 PHIL 101, 121, 201, 202, 203, or 270
REL 201, COMM 101, 201 (Those planning to pursue Pharmacy should take COMM 101)
3
The Language and History of Fine Arts
ART 201, 202, 231, MUS 103, or THEA 2013
The Human Experience
PHIL 101, 203, PSY 201-202, 210, 250, 260, 291, 292, 295 REL 201, 209, 210, SOC 201, 204, 250, 2533
U.S. and World Cultures
ECON 201-202, GEO 101, 103, GOVT 201, 202, 203, HIST 101, 102, 201, 202, 240, 250, 270, 276, REL 209, 210, 219, 220, 2543
Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning
MATH 251, 252, 26111
Investigation of the Natural World
CHEM 101-1028
CHEM 230-231 or PHYS 201-2028
Computer Proficiency
CSCI 202, 203, 211, 212, or pass the Computer Proficiency Assessment3
Electives
Recommended electives in Math: Math 271 Differential Equations. Recommended electives in CHEM or CHME ENG: PHYS 201-202. Recommended electives in PHY & ENG: MATH 224, CSCI 221. (No more than two additional credit hours may be taken for elective credit.) (Foreign Language: it is recommended that students check with their desired transfer institution to determine foreign language requirements.)10-15
Total60

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Associate in Science Degree – Life Science (A.S.-Life Science)

COURSECREDIT HOURS
The Art of Language and Ideas
ENGL 101-102 6
ENGL 200, 201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 210, 211, 212, 213, or 214
PHIL 101, 121, 201, 202, 203, or 270
REL 201, COMM 101, 201 (Those planning to pursue Pharmacy should take COMM 101)
3
The Language and History of Fine Arts
ART 201, 202, 231, MUS 103, or THEA 2013
The Human Experience
PHIL 101, 203, PSY 201-202, 210, 250, 260, 291, 292, 295 REL 201, 209, 210, SOC 201, 204, 250, 2533
U.S. and World Cultures
ECON 201-202, GEO 101, 103, GOVT 201, 202, 203, HIST 101, 102, 201, 202, 240, 250, 270, 276, REL 209, 210, 219, 220, 2543
Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning
MATH 217 3
MATH 200 or MATH 251 (Students should check with transfer institution to determine specific requirements)3-4
Investigation of the Natural World
BIO 151-1528
CHEM 101-102 8
CHEM 230-231 or PHYS 101-102 8
Biology take CHEM 230-231 Forensic Science take PHYS 101-202 Pre-Medicine, Dental, Pharmacy all four sequences recommended
Computer Proficiency3
CSCI 202, 203, 221, 222 or pass the Computer Proficiency Assessment
Electives
Bio 211 & Bio 218 recommended for Biology track. MATH 252 recommended for Forensic Chemistry track. Pre- Pharmacy one additional Math course. (No more than two additional PE credit hours may be taken for elective credit.) (Foreign Language: it is recommended that students check with their desired transfer institution to determine their foreign language requirements.)8-12
Total60

Associate in Science Degree – Clinical Lab Sciences (A.S.-Clinical Lab Sciences)

COURSECREDIT HOURS
The Art of Language and Ideas
ENGL 101-102 6
ENGL 200, 201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 210, 211, 212, 213, or 214 PHIL 101, 121, 201, 202, 203, or 270
REL 201, COMM 101, 201 (Those planning to pursue Pharmacy should take COMM 101).
3
The Language and History of Fine Arts
ART 201, 202, 231, MUS 103, or THEA 2013
The Human Experience
PHIL 101, 203, PSY 201-202, 210, 250, 260, 291, 292, 295, REL 201, 209, 210, SOC 201, 204, 250, 2533
U.S. and World Cultures
ECON 201-202, GEO 101, 103, GOVT 201, 202, 203, HIST 101, 102, 201, 202, 240, 250, 270, 276, REL 209, 210, 219, 220, 2543
Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning
MATH 110, 121, 151, 200, 217, 224, 251, 252, 261, 2716-8
Investigation of the Natural World
BIO 101, 205-206, CHEM 101-102, 23024
Computer Proficiency
CSCI 202, 203, 221, 222, or pass the Computer Proficiency Assessment3
Electives
(No more than two additional credit hours may be taken for elective credit.) (Foreign Language: it is recommended that students check with their desired transfer institution to determine their foreign language requirements.)3-8
Total60

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Liberal Arts Certificate

The Liberal Arts Certificate (31 cr.) is designed to document students’ progress towards the A.A. or A.S. degrees. After two semesters of coursework, students will have a solid grounding in the liberal arts and will be prepared for their sophomore year, either at Richard Bland College or elsewhere.

Courses required: Math 121 (or higher); ENGL 101, 102; one lab science course; two HIST courses; two Social/Behavioral Science courses; two elective courses in science, math, or the humanities.


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Communication Certificate

The Communication Certificate is designed to equip students interested in pursuing any degree
or profession with outstanding communication and human interaction skills. The program
consists of three courses (9 credit hours): COMM 101 – Public Speaking, COMM 102 –
Introduction to Communication, and COMM 201 – Interpersonal Communication.


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Fine Arts Certificate

The Fine Arts Certificate (15 cr.) is designed to parallel the first year of foundation courses for the BFA. The program is a stackable credential which fits seamlessly into either the AA or AS transfer programs.

Courses required: ART 101, ART 102, ART 103, ART 104, and ART 292. (ART 201 recommended).


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Logistics Certificate

The Logistics Management Certificate program is designed to meet the needs of this high-demand career field. This program teaches tangible skills that will prepare you for work in the global economy. Our quantitative courses are technology intensive to optimize effective engagement with complex systems and networks in most STEM oriented fields.

The program is five courses, sixteen credits: LOG 101, LOG 120, LOG 130, LOG 140, LOG 201.


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Project Management Certificate

This program teaches tangible skills that will prepare you for work in our global economy. Our quantitative courses are technology intensive to optimize effective engagement with complex systems and networks in most STEM oriented fields. Project Management is one of several stackable credentials at Richard Bland College and is a perfect addition to our Associate Degree.

The program is five courses, sixteen credits: PM 101, PM 125, PM 135, LOG 140, PM 201.


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Course Descriptions

Courses at Richard Bland College are designed to provide basic knowledge and understanding of the liberal arts and sciences. They comprise a core curriculum of general education requirements that prepare students to transfer to baccalaureate-level institutions. 

Course Interpretation

A single number listing for a course, such as ART 231, indicates it is a one-semester course and may be offered each semester or only one semester each year. Courses listed with a double number such as HIST 201/HIST 202 and designated as semester courses, consist of two one-semester courses either of which may be taken without the other. Courses listed with a double number such as CHEM 101-102 and designated as a continuous course, consist of two one-semester courses, the first of which can be taken without the second, but the second of which cannot be taken without the successful completion of the first. Course abbreviations ending in “L” denote a laboratory component to the course. The College reserves the right to withdraw any course or program.

Course Prerequisites, Corequisites

Course prerequisites and corequisites state requirements for student entry into courses, and reflect necessary preparation for attempting the course. It is the student’s responsibility to be aware of these as stated in the catalog, and to have taken prerequisites recently enough to be of value. Students may be excluded from or dismissed from courses for which they have not earned the prerequisite. Questions should be addressed to the academic department or course instructor.

Art (ART)

Richard Bland College promotes an appreciation of art and aesthetics in support of our understanding of culture. Students are exposed to a variety of basic skills and gain an appreciation of art within the tradition of the liberal arts. Courses at the 200 level contribute to meeting the humanities requirement in the Core Curriculum. Art 299 does not meet the humanities requirement for the Associate Degree unless approved by the Instructional Programs Committee.

101 Basic Design, 2-D Studio
Studio, three hours; three credits each semester. A foundation course providing the basic skills, concepts, and language of two-dimensional design as related to the visual arts. Need not be taken in sequence.

102 Basic Design, 3-D Studio
Studio, three hours; three credits each semester. A foundation course providing the basic skills, concepts, and language of three-dimensional design as related to the visual arts. Need not be taken in sequence.

103 Beginning Drawing
Black and White Studio, three hours; three credits each semester. Introduction to drawing as a means of creative expression. Emphasis is on improving skills and exploring and studying the fundamental problems of perception relating to two-dimensional surfaces, utilizing traditional and experimental media including pencil, charcoal, and ink. Need not be taken in sequence.

104 Beginning Drawing
Color Studio, three hours; three credits each semester. Introduction to drawing as a means of creative expression. Emphasis is on improving skills and exploring and studying the fundamental problems of perception relating to two-dimensional surfaces, utilizing traditional and experimental media including color pencil, marker, pastel, and ink/acrylic. Need not be taken in sequence.

201-202 Art History Survey
Lecture three hours; three credits each semester. A history of architecture, sculpture, and the pictorial world arts. The first semester deals with prehistoric through Gothic art; the second semester, Renaissance through modern art. It is not necessary for the semesters to be taken in chronological order.

221-222 Intermediate Drawing
Studio; one to three credits. Introduces advanced studio topics, builds upon foundation drawing skills, and assists students in developing a portfolio for transfer into an undergraduate fine arts program.

231 Art Appreciation
Lecture three hours; three credits. An approach to understanding and appreciating the visual art through critical and creative thinking. Course is designed to improve students’ visual literacy, ability to analyze visual information, and to improve ability to make informed judgments about works of art. The course consists of lecture and discussion sessions and includes a number of field trips to area museums and galleries.

292 Portfolio Development
Three credits. Students complete three five-week labs that focus on specific topics that reinforce focus areas of their Portfolios. Students may select from a menu of lab projects designed to complete transfer portfolio requirements, including anatomy, color, perspective, 3D modeling, and time-based experimental digital imaging. Includes individual assignments and critiques, as well as site visits to learn about professional art practice. Prerequisites: at least six credits of studio art and permission of instructor.

299 Special Topics in Art
One to three credits. Students develop individual learning contracts with the instructor to complete portfolios for transfer. Individual assignments and critiques, as well as research into relevant contemporary concepts and practices. Prerequisites: at least six credits of studio art and permission of instructor.


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Biology (BIO)

Biology at Richard Bland College provides a rigorous curriculum that enables students to meet the core requirements in science and prepare for transfer to a senior-level institution, and to satisfy requirements at allied health sciences schools. In particular, biology courses help develop an understanding of and appreciation for the diversity of living organisms and their structure, functions, and interactions. Most courses include laboratory and field activities.

101-102 General Biology (Lecture)
Continuous course; three hours lecture; three credits each semester. Prerequisite/corequisite English 101. Prerequisite Math 100B. Lecture and lab must be completed in order to meet the core curriculum requirements in the natural sciences. The course covers the scientific method; basic chemistry; molecular biology; genetics; evolution, the structure and function of cells, tissues, organ systems, and organisms; biodiversity; and ecology.

101L-102L General Biology (Laboratory)
Continuous course; three hours of laboratory; one credit each semester. Prerequisite: Student must have completed or be concurrently enrolled in the corresponding biology lecture. Laboratory work emphasizes the principles discussed in lecture.

108 Introduction to Ecology (Lecture and Lab)
Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory, four hours credit. Prerequisite: Math 100A and ENGL 101. BIO 108 is a one-semester introduction to selected principles of ecology and their application to current environmental issues. The overarching goal is to better understand organisms and how they interact with their environments; while specific topics include nutrient cycling, competition and predator/prey interactions, population growth and regulatory processes, and biodiversity within the world’s ecosystems. Applications range from large scale to local and focuses on the anthropogenic impacts.

Completion of BIO 108 will satisfy four credits of the core requirements in Natural Sciences. This course does not satisfy the prerequisites for advanced courses in Biology. This course should not be taken by students planning to major in Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics, Allied Health, Psychology, or Sociology.

110 Contemporary Biology
Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory, four hours credit. Prerequisite: Math 100B (with a grade of C or higher) or placement into a level 3, 4, or 5 math course. BIO 110 is a one-semester life science course designed specifically for non-majors. The course will focus on selected topics taken from current headline events. In each topic there will be two emphases: the basic biological principles of the topic, and the interaction of biological science and the human population and the government.

Completion of BIO 110 will satisfy four credits of the core requirements in Natural Sciences. This course does not satisfy the prerequisites for advanced courses in Biology and cannot be combined with BIO 101 or 102 to complete degree requirements. This course should not be taken by students planning to major in Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics, Allied Health, Psychology, or Sociology.

111 Medical Terminology
Two hours lecture; two credits. A study of scientific terms, root words, prefixes and suffixes used in medical and allied health fields.

151-152 Biological Science
Continuous course; three hours lecture; three hours laboratory; four credits each semester. This is a two-semester introductory biology sequence for potential biology and health pre-professional majors. Prerequisite/Corequisite: English 101 and Math 121. A grade of “C” or better will be required to advance to BIO 152. BIO 151 will be offered every Fall semester or as conditions warrant. Students taking BIO 151 cannot get credit for BIO 101. Co-enrollment in CHEM 101 is strongly recommended. These courses will cover basic biochemistry, cell structure and function, the flow of energy, molecular genetics, evolution, the diversity of life, comparative plant/animal anatomy and physiology, and ecology, providing students foundational knowledge in the biological sciences

205-206 Human Anatomy and Physiology
Continuous course; three hours lecture; three hours laboratory or online course; four credits each semester. Corequisites: English 101 and Math 121. Prerequisite: Biology 101 or Biology 151. Strongly recommended: Chemistry 101. This course is specifically designed for students in the health sciences, providing a comprehensive and systematic knowledge of the structure and function of the human body through an integrated approach.

Dissections, experiments and demonstrations completed in the laboratory parallel the lectures. Check transfer school for transferability.

211 Microbiology
Three hours lecture; three hours laboratory; four credits. Prerequisite: Biology 101 or Biology 151 and strongly recommended Chemistry 101. A study will be made of the morphology, physiology, taxonomy and epidemiology of bacteria, rickettsia, and some of the viruses, lower fungi, protozoa and metazoa. The techniques of isolation, culture, staining, identification, and control of bacteria will be a major part of the laboratory work. The principles of immunology and sterilization will be demonstrated.

218 Cell Biology
Three hours lecture; three credit course. Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in Biology 151. Chemistry 101 is strongly recommended. The course presents the molecular aspects of cells including organization and maintenance of cellular structure, energetics, differential gene expression, cell to cell communication, and reproduction. This course will be offered every spring semester.

230 Plant Biology
Three hours lecture; three hours laboratory; four hours credit. This is an integrated lecture and laboratory course. The lecture will concentrate on morphology and physiology of herbaceous and wood plant divisions within the plant kingdom, as well as, other organisms generally included in the study of plants. Topics covered include: diversity of plant life, plant structure and function, growth and development, metabolism, reproduction, and evolution. The laboratory will supplement the Botany lecture. Laboratory work will include microscopic examination of typical plant cells and tissues, experiments to illustrate plant physiology and tissue culture experiences.

299 Special Topics in Biology
One to four credits. Prerequisite: General Biology 101-102 or permission of the instructor. In depth study of a selected topic in the Biological Sciences as agreed upon by the instructor and the student. The topic will be studied for an entire semester.


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Business (BUS)

Business courses at Richard Bland College provide a general background in the field of business and accounting. Students planning to major in business should take BUS 201 and 202.

104 Introduction to Business
Lecture three hours or online course; three credits. The course presents elementary concepts in the major areas of business. Students learn how businesses function, the institutions of business, and the relationships of business and government. The course introduces students to various business careers.

201 Principles of Accounting I
First semester; three hours lecture; three credits. Corequisite: Math 121 or placement into a Level 4 or 5 Math course. The course presents accounting principles and their application to service and merchandising businesses. The accounting cycle, income determination, and financial reporting are stressed. Sophomore status is recommended.

202 Principles of Accounting II
Second semester; three hours lecture; three credits. Prerequisite: BUS 201. The course presents accounting principles and applications as they apply to partnerships and corporations. Analysis of financial data and introductory cost and managerial accounting concepts are stressed.

299 Special Topics in Business
One to three hours lecture or directed study; one to three credits. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. In-depth study of a selected topic in business. May be repeated with different topics.


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Chemistry (CHEM)

Chemistry courses at Richard Bland College provide the student with a comprehensive introduction into the composition and properties of materials. All chemistry courses and their associated laboratories can be applied to the core curriculum science requirement and are appropriate for transfer to senior institutions.

101-102 General Chemistry (Lecture)
Continuous course; three hours; three credits. Prerequisites: Placement into, completion of–or current enrollment in–MATH 121 or higher. A “C” or better in Chemistry 101 is required to advance to Chemistry 102. Completion of corresponding Chemistry Lab is recommended. In order to meet the core curriculum natural science requirement, Chemistry Lecture and Lab must both be completed. This course discusses atomic and molecular structure, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, states of matter, thermo-chemistry, chemical kinetics, equilibria, acid-base chemistry, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and the descriptive chemistry of some elements.

101L-102L General Chemistry (Laboratory)
Continuous course; three hours; one credit. Prerequisite: Student must have completed or be concurrently enrolled in the corresponding Chemistry Lecture. Laboratory work to illustrate principles discussed in lecture. Laboratory includes experiments in synthesis, physicochemical properties, titrations, equilibria, and qualitative analysis.

110 Concepts of Chemistry (Lecture)
Three hours; three credits. Prerequisites: Math 100B (with a grade of C or higher), or placement into a level 3, 4, or 5 math course. Chemical concepts are discussed in the context of current societal issues. Completion of CHEM 110 together with CHEM 110L will satisfy four credits of the core requirement in natural sciences. This course does not satisfy the prerequisites for advanced courses in chemistry and cannot be combined with CHEM 101 or 102 to complete degree requirements.

110L Concepts of Chemistry (Laboratory)
Three hours; one credit. Corequisite: CHEM 110 (Lecture). Completion of CHEM 110L together with CHEM 110 will satisfy four credits of the core requirement in the natural sciences. Experimental work correlated with the CHEM 110 lecture course. This course does not satisfy the prerequisites for advanced courses in chemistry and cannot be combined with CHEM 101 or 102 to complete degree requirements.

230-231 Organic Chemistry
Continuous course; three hours lecture; three hours laboratory; four credits. Prerequisite: General Chemistry 101 Lecture and Lab-102 Lecture and Lab or consent of the instructor. A “C” or better in Chemistry 230 is required to advance to Chemistry 231. The chemical and physical properties of organic compounds are related to molecular structure. The functional groups are studied systematically in the context of Lewis acid-base principles. Modern spectroscopic techniques are discussed.

299 Special Topics in Chemistry
One to three hours lecture, laboratory, or directed study; one to four credits. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. In-depth study of a selected topic in chemistry. May be repeated with different topics. 


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Communications (COMM)

Communications courses at Richard Bland College provide the basic skills used in oral communication. The ability to effectively communicate through oral channels is useful component that an educated individual will find useful in the future. 

101 Public Speaking
Three hours lecture and student presentations; three credits. A practical course in preparing and delivering speeches. The development of a basic idea by research and thought as well as its preparation, organization, and delivery style is stressed. Additional historical background as well as material addressing perception, language, listening, audiences and non-verbal communication is covered.

102 Introduction to Communication
Three hour lecture and student presentations; three credits. This course is a practical, hands-on experience in which students will actively participate in each class.

Through the lens of their own journey to date as human beings and on-going self-discovery, students will become acquainted with the major aspects and types of communication: basic elements of the communication process, perception, listening, verbal communication, nonverbal communication, interpersonal communication, intercultural communication, small group communication, and mass/technologically-mediated communication. The goal of the course is to equip students with outstanding communication skills for use in real-world applications.

201 Interpersonal Communication
Three hours lecture and student presentations; three credits. A practical course in the theories and elements involved in interpersonal communication. Study of the factors, which influence our ability to effectively communicate, development of relationships, the role of the self in communication, the resolution of conflict and communication on the job and in daily life.

299 Special Topics in Speech
One to three credits. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. In-depth study of a selected topic in speech.


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Computer Science (CSCI)

The computer science department wants to ensure that students are technologically savvy and fluent. Thus, students will be able to use current applications programs to locate and retrieve data from the Internet and other sources, analyze that data, extract conclusions, and publish them in an appropriate and meaningful manner. Two courses in programming are offered for those intending to major in computer science.

202 Computer Applications I
Three hours lecture or online; three credits. Prerequisite: typing speed of 25 words per minute with zero errors. Includes Microsoft Windows, word processing, spreadsheet analysis, presentation graphics, internet exploration, and research.

203 Computer Applications II
Three hours lecture; three credits. Prerequisite: successful completion of CSCI 202 or an equivalent background. Advanced Microsoft Office techniques in word processing, spreadsheet analysis, database management and query design, and presentation graphics.

Note: Computer Science 221 and 222 are designed for students who are planning to major in computer science.

221 Programming for Computer Science & Engineering Majors I
Two hours lecture, two hours laboratory, four credits. Prerequisite: Math 121 or equivalent or consent of the instructor.
This course provides an introduction to the basic concepts and practices of computer programming. By the end of the course, the students should be able to write programs in one or more structured, object-oriented programming languages. Topics include flow-charts and algorithms, basic data types and arrays, Boolean logic, control structures, and object-oriented program design. Students will learn to employ good programming practices, including modular design, effective use of comments, and good version control. The course focuses on developing foundational programming skills that are universal to the practice of programming, rather than an in-depth exploration of the specifics of any particular language. Comparisons will be made between the syntax and structure of several languages, including C/C++, Java, and Python. This course follows the ACM guidelines for CS 1.

222 Programming for Computer Science & Engineering Majors II
Two hours lecture, two hours laboratory; four credits.
Prerequisite: CSCI 221 or equivalent, or consent of the instructor. This course provides an advanced course in computer programming for students with a solid background in introductory C++ or Java. Topics include objects and classes in Java, object-oriented programming design, inheritance, polymorphism, exceptions, recursion, and advanced data structures. While the focus of the course will be object-oriented programming in Java, students with experience in other languages (such as C/C++ or Python) will be encouraged to pursue independent projects that allow them to study the implementation of these same concepts in the context of other programming languages. The course will also help students to further develop good coding practices that are universal to the process of programming, whatever the language. This course follows the ACM guidelines for CS 1.

299 Special Topics in Computer Science
One to three credits. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. In-depth study of a selected topic in computer science. May be repeated with different topics.


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Economics (ECON)

Economics is the scientific study of the production, distribution and consumption of goods and services. The basic principles of macroeconomics and microeconomics comprise the course offerings at Richard Bland College.

201 Principles of Economics (Macro)
Three hours lecture; three credits. This is the first of the Principles of Economics sequence. Topics include economic problems of scarcity, theories of money and banking, Keynesian Model, inflation, employment, and economic growth.

202 Principles of Economics (Micro)
Three hours lecture; three credits. This is the second of the Principles of Economics sequence. Topics include pure competition, oligopoly, monopoly, monopolistic competition, labor, government regulation and the agricultural sector.

299 Special Topics in Economics
One to three credits. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. In-depth study of a selected topic in economics. May be repeated with different topics.


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Education (EDUC)

Richard Bland College is committed to helping interested students prepare for careers in teaching. Through a partnership with Longwood University, RBC students can begin completing degree requirements while at Richard Bland.

200 Introduction to the Teaching Profession
Two hours lecture; two hours credit. Overview of the teaching profession, including lesson planning, current educational research, parental involvement, classroom assessments, effective classroom environment, and Virginia’s Standards of Learning. Students also will gain an understanding of professional requirements such as PRAXIS and certification. Students considering teaching as a career are encouraged to take this course. Those completing EDUC 200 are eligible to begin their teaching practicum (school-based experiences) through Longwood.


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English (ENGL)

English courses at Richard Bland College teach students to think critically, to write effectively, and to understand and appreciate literary traditions. A requirement of every English course is an acceptable standard of spoken and written English.

100 Developmental English
Three hours lecture; three credits. This course is not designed for degree or transfer credit. An examination of the rhetorical, linguistic, grammatical, and psychological principles of developing a successful writing process. Daily writing assignments. Designed to help students with writing problems prepare to meet the challenges and expectations of English 101. Students must earn a “C” or higher before moving to English 101.

101 Writing and Research
Three hours lecture; three credits. Prerequisite: Placement through the admissions placement test or the student must earn a “C” or higher in English 100. Practice in formulating the thesis statement, outlining, sentence construction, paragraph and essay development, and responsible research techniques. Frequent paragraphs, essays, revisions, and a research paper.

102 Introduction to Literary Genres
Three hours lecture; three credits. Prerequisite: English 101. Introduction to the three major literary genres and the techniques of literary analysis to heighten the student’s appreciation and enjoyment of fiction, drama, and poetry. Continued emphasis on effective writing. Quizzes, essay examinations, critical essays.

200 The Craft of Researched Writing
Three hours lecture; three credits. Prerequisite: English 101,102, and 24 credit hours. Practice in a variety of research techniques and in writing a longer researched essay. One 15-page researched essay, process papers, research tasks, research notebook, annotated bibliography in progress, and daily writing. Recommended for students transferring to writing- intensive majors such as history and English. Does not fulfill a humanities requirement for graduation.

201 Western World Literature
Three hours lecture; three credits. Prerequisite: completion of English 101-102. Dominant literatures, ideas, conventions, attitudes, writers, and influence from Classical Antiquity and the Middle Ages through the Renaissance. Among authors and works studied are Homer, the Bible, the Greek playwrights, Virgil, the Song of Roland, Chaucer, Rabelais, Montaigne, Cervantes, Shakespeare, Donne, and Milton.

202 Western World Literature
Three hours lectures; three credits. Prerequisite: completion of English 101-102. Dominant literatures, ideas, conventions, attitudes, writers, and influences from Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Realism, and Naturalism to the Modern World. Among authors studied are Moliere, Voltaire, Madame de LaFayette, Goethe, Coleridge, Austin, Keats, Balzac, Browning, Whitman, Melville, Dostoevsky, Mann, Joyce, Kafka, Faulkner, Camus, Ellison, Solzhenitsyn, and Garcia Marquez.

203 English Literature through the Eighteenth Century
Three hours lecture; three credits. Prerequisite: completion of English 101-102. The literature of England from the Anglo-Saxon period through the eighteenth century, emphasizing representative authors and works and recurring themes, forms, and their variations within the historical context. Among authors and works studied are Beowulf, Chaucer, Spenser, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Donne, Milton, Swift and Pope.

204 English Literature: Romanticism to the Present
Three hours lecture; three credits. Prerequisite: completion of English 101-102. The literature of England from the Romantic period to the present, emphasizing representative authors and works and recurring themes, forms, and their variations within the historical context. Among authors studied are Burns, Wordsworth, Byron, Shelley, Keats, Tennyson, Browning, Hardy, Joyce, Eliot and Woolf.

205 American Literature through the Civil War
Three hours lecture; three credits. Prerequisite: completion of English 101-102. American literature and its background from Native American oratory to 1865. Among authors studied are Franklin, Irving, Bryant, Hawthorne, Poe, Melville, Emerson, Thoreau and Whitman.

206 American Literature: Civil War to the Present
Three hours lecture; three credits. Prerequisite: completion of English 101-102. American literature and its background since 1865. Among authors studied are Twain, Crane, Frost, Eliot, Pound, O’Neill, Williams, Faulkner, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Plath and Dove.

210 Shakespeare
Three hours lecture; three credits. Prerequisite: completion of English 101-102. Reading of representative histories, comedies, tragedies, and sonnets within their historical context, and in light of current critical viewpoints.

211 Contemporary Literature
Three hours lecture; three credits. Prerequisite: completion of English 101-102. Reading of selected and related contemporary European, British, American or World prose, fiction, drama, or poetry.

212 Fantasy: Beowulf to the Present
Three hours lecture; three credits. Prerequisite: completion of English 101-102. An introduction to and historical survey of fantasy literature, beginning with Beowulf and traced through contemporary literature. An examination of writing styles and thematic approaches that reflect the styles and approaches of “mainstream” literature. Authors studied include the Beowulf poet, Tennyson, Carroll, Grahame, Tolkien, Feist, McKillip, Jordan and others.

213 Science Fiction
Three hours lecture; three credits. Prerequisite: completion of English 101-102. An examination of the philosophical, scientific, psychological, and literary aspects of science fiction from Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein to the present. Authors include Shelley, Verne, Wells, Abbott, Stapledon, Asimov, Clarke, Dickson, Brin, Benford and others.

214 African-American Literature
Three hours lecture; three credits. Prerequisite: completion of English 101-102. An introduction to and survey of the literature of African-American writers from 1746 to contemporary times. A historical study of literature from various periods such as the “Harlem Renaissance.” Emphasis on literary themes, as well as genres such as “slave narratives.” Authors include Phyllis Wheatley, Frederick Douglas, W.E.B. DuBois, Langston Hughes, James Baldwin, Rita Dove and Nobel Prize author Toni Morrison.

299 Special Topics in English
One to three credits. Study of a selected topic or literary genre in European, British, or American literature. Students are welcome to suggest a topic to any English instructor.


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French (FREN)

Students are encouraged to continue with a modern foreign language initially studied in high school. A student with three or more high school years of a language should not register for the 101- 102 level of that language without the consent of the instructor.

101-102 Elementary French I, II
Continuous course; four hours lecture; four credits each semester. Students with three or more high school years of French should register for French 201-202. A student with two to three years of high school French may join French 102 in the second semester. Training in listening comprehension, pronunciation and conversation, vocabulary and idioms, reading, grammar, and composition.

201-202 Intermediate French I, II
Continuous course; three hours lecture; three credits each semester. Prerequisite: French 101-102 or three years of high school French. A student may join French 202 in the second semester with consent of the instructor. Emphasis will be placed on listening and comprehension, review and strengthening of vocabulary and idioms, grammar, verb forms, and increasing reading, composition and speaking ability.


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Geography (GEO)

Geography analyzes global spatial arrangements and their causes and consequences. The geography courses at Richard Bland College focus on the major world regions and the relationships between geography and culture.

101 Major World Regions
Three hours lecture; three credits. This course is a survey regional geography. The interaction of cultural, economic, political, physical and social processes in each of the world’s major regions is explored and examined. Patterns, problems, and prospects in the world’s principal human- geographic regions are discussed.

103 Cultural Geography
Three hours lecture; three credits. The course is structured to address human geography’s core topics: population, cultural patterns and processes, the political organization of space, agricultural and rural land use, industrial and economic development and cities.

299 Special Topics in Geography
Either semester; one to three hours; one to three credits. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. In- depth study of a selected topic in Geography.


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Government (GOVT)

Government courses focus on the organization and exercise of legitimate authority within the political process. The structure and function of American government and its influence in world affairs is the purpose of government courses at Richard Bland College.

201 American Government and Politics
Three hours lecture; three credits. This course provides students an introduction to American government and politics, emphasizing both the practical aspects of governmental operations and the understanding of politics as an ongoing, active process. Arranged topically, the course explores the nature and functions of government, politics, and governmental organization. Civil liberties, civil rights, the role of the media and industry, and public opinion are also covered.

202 The United States in World Affairs
Three hours lecture; three credits. A study of world politics and how it influences the United States and its relationship with other countries. The Cold War from containment to the Soviet collapse will be examined, but emphasis will be on current political, economic and social problems. Discussion of current affairs will be frequent and culminate with the International Forum at which time a series of distinguished representatives of foreign powers visit both the campus and the classroom. Students are expected to attend the International Forum evening programs.

203 Comparative Government and Politics
Three hours lecture; three credits. This course introduces the comparative analysis of politics. It studies the political cultures, structures and processes of politics in diverse parts of the world in order to compare how the nations emerged and developed, how the culture of a society influences politics in that nation, and how various national structures affect a nation’s ability to determine policy goals and attempt to implement them. It also seeks to bring some coherence to the analysis of an otherwise diverse array of system types, and to heighten sensitivity to matters of race, class, and gender and increase tolerance for different cultures.

253 State and Local Government
Three hours lecture; three credits. This course is designed to provide the student with a basic knowledge of how state and local governments work in the United States. Attention will be paid to how federalism — new or otherwise — impacts on these units of government. The course also examines the political actors — legislators, governors, interest groups — that affect state and local politics, as well as specific policy issues (e.g., education, poverty).

299 Special Topics in Government
One to three credits. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. In-depth study of a selected topic in Government.


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Health (HLTH)

Health is the study of the principles of wellness at the individual, community, and societal levels. Health courses at Richard Bland College focus on health practices, nutrition, and wellness as a proactive strategy.

225 Health and Wellness
Lecture three hours or online course; three credits. A survey of principles for promoting and developing positive health attitudes and practices. Topics include emotional wellness, physical fitness, nutrition, weight management, addictive substances, chronic and infectious diseases, sexuality, and environmental health concerns.

245 Understanding Nutrition
Three lecture hours; three credits. Prerequisite Biology 101 or 151. A scientific study of nutrition designed for nursing students, other health care providers and educators. Students will investigate the roles of the nutrients in the functioning of the human body. Overview of nutrient recommendations, food sources and functions of the nutrients, energy requirements, weight control, vegetarianism, and supplement use. Dietary recommendations and food patterns applied to culture, and prevention of nutrition related diseases in a changing society.

299 Special Topics in Health
One to three credits. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. In-depth study of a selected topic in Health.


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History (HIST)

Recognizing that human experience is continuous, history seeks to understand how people have lived in the past, and how their institutions and leadership shaped their world and our own.

Through the perspectives of the social sciences and the humanities, the study of history at Richard Bland College focuses on the processes of institutional change within societies with particular emphasis on Western Civilization and the United States.

101 Western Civilization to 1715
Three hours lecture; three credits. An introduction to the history of Western Civilization from the ancient world to the end of the 17th century. Particular emphasis is placed on political, economic, social and cultural developments and their influence in shaping our contemporary world. Corequisite: enrollment in or completion of English 101.

102 Western Civilization since 1715
Three hours lecture; three credits. An introduction to the history of Western Civilization from the end of the 17th century to the present. Emphasis is placed on Western Europe and on the political, economic, social and cultural forces that increased and then diminished European dominance throughout the world. Corequisite: enrollment in or completion of English 101.

201 American History to 1865
Three hours lecture; three credits. A survey of the history of the United States from the period of discovery to 1865. Emphasis will be on the Colonial Era, and the development of democracy and slavery. The course also covers the political and social aspects of American life, the territorial expansion of the United States, and the coming of the Great Rebellion.

202 American History since 1865
Three hours lecture; three credits. A survey of the history of the Republic from Reconstruction to the present. This course will focus on the emergence of a national culture, the rise of America to super-power status and the growing dispute over America’s role in the world; in short, what is our destiny? Chronologically, we will look at Reconstruction, industrialization, immigration, the two world wars, and the evolution of American society and culture from the late 19th century to the present.

221 The Coming of the Civil War
Lecture three hours; three credits. From a central theme covering the causes of the Civil War, the course includes the history of the American frontier and antebellum social, military, economic and cultural developments.

222 The Civil War and Reconstruction
Three hours lecture; three credits. Major emphasis is placed upon the military campaigns. Other topics include wartime economic, monetary, and fiscal policies. Diplomacy, life in the army and on the home front during the war, and American culture during the 1860s are covered. The final section of the course deals with the era of Reconstruction from 1865 to 1877, with special emphasis on Virginia and the City of Petersburg.

240 Nazi Germany
Three hours lecture; three credits. Prerequisite: Six credit hours of history, three of which may be concurrent enrollment, and/or permission of the instructor. Who knows what evil lurks? The Nazis knew, and with that knowledge they seized control of a modern industrial state. This course is the study of how a nation was brought to the brink of world conquest and of a small group of people who terrorized the western world on a scale unparalleled since the hordes of Genghis Khan stormed out of Asia. Supplemented with multimedia presentations, this course will examine the rise of the Nazi Party, the road to war, the war itself, the Holocaust, and the end of European primacy in world affairs.

250 Modern America: U.S. History Since 1945
Three hours lecture; three credits. An investigation of the post-World War II political and social history of the United States. The course examines the major political events and movements of the last fifty years, including the Cold War, McCarthyism, the civil rights movement, the Great Society, Vietnam, the counter-culture, feminism, Watergate, and the resurgence of social and economical conservatism. It explores how ordinary Americans both shaped and were shaped by these events and movements as well as the relationship between politics and long-term developments in the American economy, society, and culture. Pre-requisites: Successful completion of English 101 and three credits in history.

270 The History of Modern Britain
Three hours lecture; three credits. Great Britain has a remarkably rich and complex history that gives it a leading place in both the “Western Tradition” and in world history. This course will provide a survey of the social, cultural, economic and political histories of Britain, and its empire, between 1780 to the present. During this period, Britain became a “modern,” “liberal” state and the world’s pre- eminent industrial and imperial power. This course also will examine how British culture, mores and values impacted not only peoples’ lives in Britain and around the globe. Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or higher in ENGL 101 and HIST 101 or HIST 102.

276 The Vietnam War
Three hours lecture; three credits. A study of the United States’ involvement in Vietnam from 1945 to 1975 and the military, political, social, and cultural causes and consequences of that involvement. The course places the American involvement in Vietnam within the context of the Cold War as well as the centuries-long, multinational struggle for supremacy in Southeast Asia. Prerequisites: Successful completion of English 101 and three credits in history.

281 Lincoln, Davis, Grant and Lee: The Last Year of the Civil War
The course is especially designed to suit the needs of educators teaching in grades K – 12 and is comprised of lectures, discussions, tours of the grounds and exhibits of Pamplin Historical Park & The National Museum of the Civil War Soldier, as well as two guided field trips. Topics include: Union and Confederate strategies in the east, the common soldier in the Civil War, civilian life in besieged Petersburg, farms on the battlefront, African Americans in the Civil War, and the presidential election of 1864. The course also includes two guided field trips exploring the critical Petersburg and Appomattox campaigns. In addition, the course will provide related student activities for use in the classroom as well as an opportunity to exchange ideas with fellow educators about teaching these important topics. 3 credits, no prerequisites, open to teachers seeking professional recertification.

282 Antebellum Slavery, the Civil War and Reconstruction
The course is especially designed to suit the needs of educators teaching in grades K–12, and is comprised of lectures, discussions, tours of the grounds and exhibits of Pamplin Historical Park & The National Museum of the Civil War Soldier, as well as a field trip exploring Civil War Richmond. Topics include: North vs. South–Cultural Stereotypes, North vs. South – social, economic and political differences, slavery in antebellum Southern society, the antebellum debate about slavery, an overview of the American Civil War, Civil War soldier life, women in Civil War Richmond, teaching the Civil War with music, Civil War technology, and Reconstruction. In addition, the course will provide related student activities for use in the classroom as well as an opportunity to exchange ideas with fellow educators about teaching these important topics. 3 credits, no prerequisites, open to teachers seeking professional recertification.

296 History Internship
One to three credits. Prerequisites: six credit hours of history, three of which may be concurrent enrollment, and permission of the instructor. The internship is an introductory course into the museum environment and will emphasize the importance of learned and applied history in a historical-related museum. The purpose of the internship is to provide students with the opportunity for pre-professional experience. Students will sign a course contract that states the exact requirements to receive full credit.

299 Special Topics in History
One to three credits. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. In-depth study of a selected topic in History.


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Logistics (LOG)

101 Introduction to Logistics Management
Three hours lecture; three credits. An introduction to the field of logistics management, including a review of the entire field and its application to the business world. Included are: procurement, supply chain management, demand management, packaging and materials handling, transportation, warehousing and inventory management, international logistics, and logistics analysis.

120 Transportation and Distribution
Three hours lecture; three credits. An introduction to the field of transportation and distribution management including: the special characteristics of the five different modes of transportation, optimization of transportation choices, transportation technology, and globalization transportation. A focus is placed on the development of distribution algorithms. Prerequisite: LOG 101.

130 Inventory and Warehousing
Three hours lecture; three credits. This course focuses on the role of materials management in modern organizations, the methods of forecasting demand, the assessment of economic lot sizes and the procedures for optimizing ordering systems and inventory levels; as well as the storage of inventory, warehouse operations, order picking and delivery, and inventory movements. Prerequisite: LOG 101.

140 Logistics IT Applications
Three hours lecture; three credits. This course applies three IT programming techniques and software platforms to logistics and project management scenarios: linear programming optimization via the LINDO software platform, project management via the Microsoft Project software platform and integrated business logistics and project management activities via the SAP software platform. Prerequisites: CSCI-203 or equivalent and LOG 101.

201 Logistics Portfolio
Four hours lecture; Four credits. This course uses the case-study method to integrate the various subcomponents of effective logistics management: transportation, distribution, inventory management, warehouse management, quality management, project management, procurement, export/import documentation, export/import finance. The course culminates in a formal report and executive presentation. Prerequisites: LOG 120, 130, & 140.


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Internship Opportunities

Guidelines

An internship is an opportunity for a Richard Bland College student to gain practical experience and academic credit in a field of study by becoming actively engaged in performing job duties for an off-campus organization. The organization may be a government agency, a for-profit business, or a non-profit organization. An internship may be created for all disciplines in the Richard Bland College curriculum and will be designated as a 296 course in that discipline (i.e. Hist. 296).

The student must:

  • be currently enrolled at the College and must have previously earned at least 15 hours college credit, either at RBC or another accredited institution of higher learning
  • have a grade point average for previous college work of 2.0 or better on a 4.0 point scale

The student may:

  • earn one, two, or three credit hours in the internship, as agreed upon in the written plan; minimum hours to be completed at the internship location: 1 credit hour, 50 intern hours; 2 credit hours, 100 intern hours, and 3 credit hours, 150 intern hours
  • earn as many as 3 credit hours by intern work, in any combination of 1, 2, or 3-credit internships; Internships will be coordinated through the Office of the Dean of Faculty

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Mathematics (MATH)

Mathematics courses at Richard Bland College are designed to promote critical thinking and analytical reasoning as they develop basic mathematical skills for beginning students in the liberal arts and sciences. There are five entry points into the mathematics curriculum for freshmen.

The course in which each student enrolls is determined by the placement test score, high school mathematics courses completed, and desired major of the student.

  • Level 1 = MATH 100
  • Level 2 = MATH 110, 121
  • Level 3 = MATH 151, 200, or 217
  • Level 4 = MATH 224, 251, or 252
  • Level 5 = MATH 261, 271

Each student is required to take a placement test in mathematics before registering for any mathematics course, with the exception of students who have appropriate transfer mathematics credits or AP math scores. Courses may be taken at a lower than recommended level, but none may be taken at a higher level without the written permission of the Chair of Mathematics and Computer Science or the Dean of Faculty.

Level 1 courses are developmental mathematics courses for students who, based on high school transcripts and/or placement testing results, are not ready for the rigors of credit-bearing mathematics.
Level 2 courses are college-level, credit-bearing mathematics courses used to fulfill the Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning requirements for the A.A. and A.S. degrees . MATH 121 is the standard entry level for most college freshmen in the A.S. degrees, while MATH 110 is more appropriate for the A.A. degree. Students obtaining an A.S. degree cannot use MATH 110 to fulfill the Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning requirements for their degree.

Well-prepared students whose prospective majors require the traditional calculus sequence should take MATH 251-252 as soon as possible.
Students should be aware of the appropriate mathematics courses required for their planned majors and the four-year institutions to which they will transfer. If you have questions, ask your Learner Mentor or any math faculty member.

ADVISING NOTES:
MATH 100, MATH 100A, and MATH 100B are review courses in basic and intermediate algebra. These non-degree credit, non-transfer developmental courses are designed for the student who has a weak mathematical background and is not prepared for college-level mathematics. MATH 100 is a computer-based course designed to identify and eliminate the individual weaknesses of each student. MATH 100A and MATH 100B are traditional, non-computer based algebra courses.

MATH 110 is a terminal mathematics course for the non-science student. MATH 110 cannot be used to fulfill the Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning requirements for an A.S. degree without approval of the Dean of Faculty. Students must earn an appropriate score on the math placement test or complete MATH 100 or MATH 100A with a grade of C or higher before taking MATH 110.

MATH 121 is a college algebra course designed to prepare the student for more advanced courses in mathematics such as statistics, business calculus, and pre-calculus. Students must earn an appropriate score on the math placement test or complete MATH 100 or MATH 100B with a grade of C or higher before taking MATH 121.

MATH 251-252 is a two semester calculus sequence for students who have successfully completed 3 1/2 or 4 units of high school mathematics (including trigonometry) and have received the appropriate score on the placement test, or students who have completed MATH 151 with a grade of C or higher.

100A Basic Algebra
Four hours lecture; four credits. This course is not designed for degree or transfer credit. Recommended for the student with less than one year of high school algebra. Required for students who place at this level on the Mathematics Placement Test. A comprehensive review of basic algebra. Topics include computation using integers, polynomials, equations, applications of equations, and graphs of linear equations. Must be followed by MATH 100, MATH 100B or MATH 110.

100B Intermediate Algebra
Four hours lecture; four credits. This course is not designed for degree or transfer credit. Recommended for the student with less than two years of high school algebra. Designed for students who place at this level on the Mathematics Placement Test or have completed Math 100A with a grade of C or higher. An intermediate algebra course designed to develop the mathematical proficiency necessary to study college algebra. Topics include factoring of polynomials, rational expressions, linear and quadratic equations, applications of equations, rational exponents, and radicals. May not receive credit for MATH 100B and MATH 100. 

100 Developmental Mathematics
Four hours lecture/laboratory; four credits. This course is not designed for degree or transfer credit. Recommended for the student with less than two years of high school algebra. Required for students who place at this level on the Mathematics Placement Test. A computer-based approach to provide a comprehensive review of basic and intermediate algebra. Topics include computation using integers, polynomials, applications of equations, and graphs of linear equations, factoring of polynomials, rational expressions, linear and quadratic equations, rational exponents, and radicals. Must be followed by Math 121 or MATH 110. May not receive credit for MATH 100B and MATH 100.

100ALP Advanced Developmental Mathematics
1 hour laboratory; 1 credit. Offered only during late-start sessions during the fall and spring semesters. Enrollment is limited only to students who complete Math 100 by the start of the late-start session (usually mid-semester). This course is not designed for degree or transfer credit. A computer-based approach to provide a comprehensive review of basic and intermediate algebra. Topics include computation using integers and fractions, polynomials, applications of equations, graphs of linear equations, factoring of polynomials, rational expressions, linear and quadratic equations, rational exponents, and radicals. Must be taken with MATH 121 during the Late Start session only. May not receive credit for MATH 100ALP and MATH 100B.

110 Contemporary Mathematics
Three hours lecture; three credits. Prerequisite: MATH 100A (with a grade of C or higher) or appropriate score on the placement test. This course is designed primarily for the liberal arts student and will transfer as fulfilling the mathematics requirement at some four-year institutions, but not at others. It is intended to give the student an appreciation of the wide applicability of mathematics to many fields of study. Topics include quantitative reasoning and numeracy, mathematical models, statistical reasoning, patterns in nature, voting schemes, and fair division schemes.

121 College Algebra
Three hours lecture; three credits. Recommended for students with 2 or 3 units of high school mathematics who have received the appropriate score on the placement test, or students who have completed MATH 100 or 100B with a grade of C or higher. Topics include basic concepts of algebra, equations, inequalities, problem solving, and basic polynomial, rational, and exponential functions, with emphasis on graphing techniques, algebraic and numeric properties and applications.

151 Pre-Calculus
Four lecture hours; four credits. Prerequisite: MATH 121 (grade of C or higher) or appropriate score on the placement test. This course is designed for students who are planning to take the calculus sequence, MATH 251-252. Topics include functions and graphs, polynomial and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions, analytic trigonometry, applications of trigonometry and an introduction to limits.

200 Calculus for Business and Social Science
Three hours lecture; three credits. Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 121 (grade of C or higher or appropriate score on placement test. Not appropriate for majors in mathematics, computer science, engineering, physics, or chemistry. This course emphasizes the applications of calculus in social, behavioral, or life sciences and business or management. Topics include: limits and continuity of functions, the derivative and applications, exponential and logarithmic functions, and the definite integral and applications. (Credit will not be given for both MATH 251and MATH 200).

217 Introductory Statistics
Three hours lecture; three credits. Prerequisite: MATH121 (grade of C or higher) or appropriate score on placement test. A general introduction to random variables, descriptive statistics, sampling theory, estimation theory, tests of hypotheses, regression and correlation.

224 Elementary Linear Algebra
Three hours lecture; three credits. Prerequisite: completion of MATH 151 or placement and/or enrollment in MATH 251. Topics include systems of linear equations, matrices, determinants, vector spaces, linear transformations, eigenvalues and applications.

251-252 Calculus I-II
Continuous course. Four hours lecture; four credits. Prerequisites: two years of high school algebra, plane geometry, trigonometry and appropriate score on the placement test, or completion of MATH 151 (grade of C or higher). Placement directly into MATH 252 for a score of 3 or higher on the AP Calculus AB examination. Topics include analytic geometry, limits and continuity of functions, derivatives and applications, anti-derivatives, applications of integration, transcendental functions, techniques of integration, elementary differential equations, improper integrals, sequences and series, power series, Taylor series, parametric equations, and polar coordinates.  (Credit will not be given for both MATH 251 and MATH 200.)

261 Multivariable Calculus
Three hours lecture; three credits. Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 252 (grade of C or higher). Topics include: , vectors, vector algebra, vector functions, partial derivatives, gradients, Lagrange multipliers, multiple integration, line and surface integrals, theorems of Stokes, Green, and Gauss, and applications.

271 Differential Equations
Three hours lecture; three credits. Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 252 (grade of C or higher). Topics include: solutions of first order ordinary differential equations, higher order linear differential equations using the methods of undetermined coefficients and variation of parameters, Laplace transforms, and applications of differential equations.

299 Special Topics in Mathematics
One to three credits. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. In-depth study of selected topics in mathematics. May be repeated with different topics.


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Music (MUS)

Music courses at Richard Bland College support the liberal arts by providing a basic understanding of the role of music in social and cultural development. Performance opportunities are offered in choral and instrumental music. 

103 Music Appreciation
Three hours lecture; three credits. Important in the general education of the college student who is non-music major, the course provides the foundation for a lifetime of broadening experiences in the enjoyment of music. The course presents the element, structure, and history of music with major emphasis on developing listening skills and acquiring a basic repertoire of varied examples of music literature.

299 Special Topics in Music
One to three credits. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. In-depth study of a selected topic in music.


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Philosophy (PHIL)

Philosophy is the art of critical reflection on fundamental questions concerning the nature of reality, value and knowledge. The Philosophy courses at Richard Bland College provide students with an overview of the canonical positions and theories which have shaped the major Euro- American and Asian philosophical traditions, as well as with the opportunity to develop the analytic skills of argumentation and evaluation. The critical reasoning skills emphasized in Philosophy have aided students who have gone on to pursue careers in diverse fields, including: academia, government, writing and law.

101 Introduction to Philosophy
Three hours lecture; three credits. Corequisites: English 101 & Mathematics 101. This course is intended to serve as an introduction to Philosophy as an academic field of study, an art of personal reflection, and a tool for dialogue. In this light, it examines a few perennial philosophical questions and the major arguments and positions which fall under these, questions which fall under these, questions such as: Who am I? What is a person?

Are we really free? Is there life after death? What sort of meaning is possible in life? Films and literature may be utilized to reveal how the art of philosophical reflection extends beyond canonical philosophical texts. Emphasis will be placed on critical justification and evaluation.

121 Critical Thinking
Three lecture hours; three credits. Corequisites: English 101 & Mathematics 101. This course is intended to introduce students to the art of critical thinking, the careful and deliberate determination about whether to accept, reject, or suspend judgment about a claim. As with the acquiring of any skills, practice is essential. Hence, exercises both inside and outside of class will be required.

The course will include examinations of the concepts of ‘argument’ and ‘evidence,’ common fallacies in reasoning, techniques of Categorical and Proposition logic to assess deductive validity, and techniques for assessing inductive strength. Attention will be give to the application of critical thinking skills to the evaluation of claims found outside academia, including newspaper editorials and issues centering around the “paranormal” (e.g., ESP, reincarnation, UFO’s, channeling).

201 Ancient and Medieval Philosophy
Three hours lecture; three credits. Prerequisite: English 101 & Mathematics 101; recommended: Philosophy 121. Humans have always sought answers to fundamental questions about the nature of reality and value. However, it is the subjugation of these “answers” to critical standards of justification and evaluation which is the hallmark of Philosophy. This course will highlight the birth of this methodology in the Ancient civilizations of India, China, Greece, and Rome, and follow its development in the Medieval period in Europe and Asia. Emphasis will be placed on careful interpretation and evaluation of canonical texts.

202 Modern Philosophy
Three hours lecture; three credits. Prerequisite: English 101 & Mathematics 101; recommended: Philosophy 121. Philosophy is associated with fundamental questions: metaphysical questions concerning the nature and origin of the universe and the individual; epistemological questions concerning the nature of truth and nature and possibility of knowledge; and ethical questions concerning the nature of the moral judgments.

However, more fundamentally, Philosophy is a method of inquiry – a critical method where speculation and dogmatic acceptance is replaced by a concern for evidence and rational justification. While this method was not invented in the Modern period (17th-20th centuries), it was resurrected and extended in this period. This course will highlight the rebirth of this method within the Modern philosophical tradition of Europe and America, as well as noting comparisons between this tradition and contemporary Asian philosophical views.

Emphasis will be placed on careful interpretation and evaluation of canonical texts.

203 Introduction to Ethics
Three hours lecture; three credits. Corequisites: English 101 & Mathematics 101; recommended: English 101. This course is intended to acquaint students with the practical relevance of ethics within everyday life and to aid them in cultivating the skills inherent in ethical reasoning. Emphasis will be placed on the usefulness of major ethical theories in facilitating personal reflection and interpersonal dialogue, via detailed examinations of opposing ethical arguments over several contemporary moral issues, such as: war & terrorism, punishment & the death penalty, world poverty & hunger, abortion & cloning, animal rights and environmentalism. Attention is given to the application of ethics to the evaluation of moral claims found outside academia, including newspaper editorials.

270 Introduction to Asian Religious Thought
Three hours lecture; three credits. Prerequisite: English 101 & Mathematics 101; recommended Phil 101 or Rel 201. This course is intended to serve as an introduction to some of the methods, issues & theories associated within major Asian philosophical religious systems, focusing on Vedantic Hinduism, Early Buddhism, Philosophical Taoism, & Zen Buddhism. Perennial issues which will be addressed include: the Nature of Sacred, the relationship between the Sacred and the self, life and death, happiness and meaning, and morality. In addition to the content of the course, students should find the analytic “tools” utilized in the course helpful in all courses of study requiring critical thinking as well as in assessing the plethora of arguments and pseudo-reasoning which pervade everyday life. Films and literature will be utilized to reveal how the themes of the course extend beyond canonical religious texts. Personal reflection and group discussion exercises will also be required. This course will only satisfy one discipline to complete the Associate Degree requirement.

299 Special Topics in Philosophy
One to three credits. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. In-depth study of a selected topic in Philosophy.


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Physical Education (PE)

The physical education curriculum is designed to provide instruction in a wide variety of lifetime fitness and wellness activities. Courses are selected on the basis of health-related and skill-related fitness components and safety. No more than two one hour PE credits (two one-credit classes) may be used as elective credits.

Students planning to pursue a bachelor’s degree are advised to check the Physical Education requirement of the institution to which they wish to transfer.

120 Fitness and Wellness/Cross Training
Three hours lecture/activity: two credits. This course is designed to establish a clear understanding of basic concepts of wellness, and to adopt and maintain a program of prescribed physical exercise.

121 Horsemanship
Students will learn the basics of caring for and handling horses. Students will be introduced to natural horsemanship concepts. Horsemanship Pre- requisite: permission of the instructor.

120-190 Activities
One credit. A total of 2 credit hours may be used as electives towards graduation. A specific course may not be repeated for additional credit. These courses are all activity courses and only some of them will be offered during any semester. Examples of potential courses include team sports: basketball, volleyball, flag football, soccer; individual sports: tennis, golf and bowling; physical fitness: jogging, weightlifting, aerobics, jazz dancing; outdoors: hiking, canoeing, bicycling, scuba, horseback riding.


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Physics (PHYS)

Physics is a fundamental science concerned with understanding the natural phenomena that occur in the physical universe. At Richard Bland College, basic courses are offered for both general students and those preparing for more advanced studies in the physical sciences and engineering. These courses fulfill the core curriculum requirement in science.

101-102 College Physics
Continuous course; three hours lecture; three hours laboratory; four credits. PHYS 101 must be completed prior to enrolling in PHYS 102. Prerequisite: completion of MATH 121 with a grade of B or higher or placement into a Level 4 or 5 Math Course. College Physics is an introductory physics course (using algebra and trigonometry, but not calculus) commonly taken by general students and those planning to major in various life science areas. This is not intended for those students who are planning to major in engineering or the physical sciences. Topics covered in PHYS 101 include kinematics, Newton’s laws, energy and momentum conservation, and rotational motion. Topics covered in PHYS 102 include, thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism. Special emphasis is placed on developing problem solving skills using multiple representations. Extensive use is made of microcomputer-based laboratories. Students who take PHYS 101-102 cannot receive credit for PHYS 201-202.

201-202 University Physics
Continuous course; three hours lecture; three hours laboratory; four credits. PHYS 201 must be completed prior to taking PHYS 202. Prerequisite/ corequisite: MATH 251. (It is recommended that MATH 251 be completed prior to this course, if possible.) University Physics is a vector calculus-based introductory physics course for engineering and physical science majors. Topics covered in PHYS 201 include kinematics, Newton’s laws, energy and momentum conservation, and rotational motion. Topics covered in PHYS 202 include thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism. Special emphasis is placed on developing problem solving skills using multiple representations. Extensive use is made of microcomputer-based laboratories. Students taking PHYS 201-202 cannot receive credit for PHYS 101-102.

299 Special Topics in Physics
Either semester; one to three hours; one to three credit hours. Prerequisite: Consent of the Instructor. In-depth study of a selected topic in Physics.


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Project Management (PM)

101 Introduction to Project Management
Three hours lecture; three credits. This introductory Project Management course provides conceptual and practical material necessary for project management. It focuses on the development of leadership skills in the management of project teams. Students examine project selection, organization, and planning process; communications and negotiations; and the set up and completion of projects using IT systems. The course also covers project uncertainty and risk assessment and how to modify projects based on time and resource constraints.

125 Team Building and Leadership
Three hours lecture; three credits. This course focuses on the leadership skills to build and sustain high-performing project teams, to build a strong team identity through vision, purpose and commitment, and to foster positive and productive team communication. It will include theoretical background on group dynamics, small group behavior and motivation, the limitations of power, types of groups, verbal and non- verbal communication skills and team-building. Prerequisite: PM 101.

135 Project Risk Management
Three hours lecture; three credits. This course provides an in-depth analysis of identifying, analyzing, evaluating, and controlling project costs and risks, while making decisions to effect project completion. State-of-the-art tools and techniques for identifying, measuring, and monitoring costs and risks in the project management environment are examined. Cost estimating, cost budgeting, activity based costing, and cost control techniques are emphasized. Decision analysis and decision tree techniques are studied to include expected value, minimax, and maximin criteria. Also covered will be areas of flawed decision-making, including such topics as groupthink, the domain of losses, the domain of gains, the Abilene paradox, the Milgram experiments, the Asch effect, and the like. The course is on how a comprehensive risk management approach can enable a project team to make the correct decisions to proactively manage issues and costs that adversely impact the successful control and completion of a project. Prerequisite: PM 101.

201 Project Management Portfolio
Four hours lecture; Four credits. This course uses the case-study method to integrate the various subcomponents of effective logistics management. It will use real data from participating Richard Bland College project management alliance companies. This course will cover specific activities that integrate project management principles with project event management, taking project events from pre-award to closure. Students will investigate and evaluate different methods for measuring project performance, including Program Evaluation and Review Techniques (PERT) to ascertain probabilistic project completion times and Critical Path Method (CPM) approaches that investigate cost management and project acceleration techniques. The course will also cover team member selection and evaluation, project reporting processes, project event conflict and risk management, and coordinating project events across the enterprise and along the supply chain. This course exposes students to approaches, methods, and systems to ensure management success under demanding cost, schedule, and performance requirements. The course culminates in a formal report and executive presentation to the instructor and to the Richard Bland College project management alliance company. Prerequisites: PM 101, PM 125, and LOG 140.


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Psychology (PSY)

Psychology is the scientific study of individual processes of thinking, feeling, and acting.

At Richard Bland College, courses in general psychology are offered along with a number of upper level courses dealing with specific topics designed for nurses, education majors, psychology majors, or students wanting to learn more about psychology.

201-202 General Psychology
Three hours lecture; three credits each semester. Basic principles of psychology as a behavioral social science. The course includes the study of psychology in everyday life, as a basic and applied science, the theoretical approaches, and as a profession. Topics covered in the first semester (201) are learning and thinking processes, workings of the mind and body, awareness of the world, motivation, emotion, states of consciousness and human development.

The second semester (202) includes such topics as human relations, theories of personality, positive adjustment to contemporary society, disorders, therapy and change, psychological testing and applications of psychology. Students taking 201- 202 cannot get credit for Psychology 210. There are no prerequisites for Psychology 201 or 202.

217 Research Methods in the Behavioral Sciences
3 contact hours lecture, 3 credits. Prerequisite: Math 217. This course provides an introduction to research methods in the behavioral sciences. Course content includes a description of the various types of research used in the behavioral sciences, threats to the reliability and validity of research, consideration of ethical issues in behavioral science research, strengths and weaknesses of sampling techniques, and a review of the levels of measurement of data analytical techniques. This course also introduces students to the selection and computation of proper statistical tests and interpretation of results.

250 Developmental Psychology
Three hours lecture; three credits. It is recommended that the student complete Survey of Psychology 210 or Psychology 201-202 prior to enrolling in this course. The study of the biological, intellectual, emotional, personality, and social factors affecting the psychological development of the individual from conception throughout the life span. This course may be used to fulfill teacher certification requirements.

260 Psychology of Personality Theories
Three hours lecture; three credits. Prerequisite: Psychology 201-202 or permission of the instructor. The systematic study of various approaches to understanding human behavior in terms of personality theories. Personality theories of Freud, Jung, From, Erickson, Allport, Skinner, Maslow, Rogers, May and others will be examined in detail.

291 Psychology of Adjustment
Three hours lecture; three credits. The study of the normal and pathological factors in psychological development as they relate to the effective and fully functioning individual. A positive approach to maintaining good mental health will be emphasized by discussion and personal application.

292 Stress Management
Three hours lecture; three credits. Prerequisite: Psychology 201-202 or Survey of Psychology 210 or permission of the instructor. An introduction to the theory and practice of stress-management. Research and application of the physical and psychological aspects of stress reaction and its management. Emphasis on relaxation techniques and cognitive restructuring methods of managing stress.

295 Human Sexuality
Three hours lecture; three credits. Prerequisite: Psychology 201-202, Survey of Psychology 210 or permission of the instructor. The systematic study of biological, psychological and sociological aspects of human sexual behavior and health throughout the life span. Films and discussions will consist of explicit sexual behaviors. Students must be 18 years of age or older to enroll in this course.

299 Special Topics in Psychology
Either semester; one to three hours; one to three credits. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. In- depth study of a selected topic in Psychology.


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Religion (REL)

Religion is fundamental to human existence and culture; it pervades the lives of a majority of humans, providing solace, guidance, communion, and hope. Religious Studies is the attempt to systematically and analytically study this phenomenon, drawing on an array of academic disciplines, including anthropology, sociology, psychology, linguistics, geography, history, philosophy, and archeology, among others.

Religion courses at Richard Bland College provide students with an overview of the beliefs and practices of the major world religions, as well as with an introduction to this inter-disciplinary field of study.

201 Introduction to Religion
Three hours lecture; three credits. Corequisite: English 101. Religion is and has been fundamental to human existence, providing solace, guidance, communion, and hope. This course will examine: the conceptual boundaries of ‘religion,’ the relation between religious intuition and rationality, different conceptions of the ‘the Sacred,’ psychological and sociological theories concerning religious belief/ faith, secularist and functionalist approaches to the study of religion, phenomenological theories of religious experience and ritual, and the role which religious attitudes and perceptions play in grounding moral convictions and providing human life with a sense of meaning. Students will be encouraged to reflect on their own religious beliefs and experiences, and various art mediums (music, poetry, short-stories, film, etc.) will be utilized to examine these religious themes.

209 Comparative Religion
Three hours lecture; three credits. An historical investigation of the world’s major religions (Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism and Christianity). Attention will be given to the origins, history, mythology, and culture of various belief systems.

210 Social History of Christianity
Three hours lecture; three credits. An investigation of the development of Christianity from the first century to the present. The inquiry will focus on pivotal theological controversies and sociocultural issues that have shaped Christian history. Particular consideration will be given to such topics as the differences between the Western and Eastern traditions, monasticism, the Reformation and Counter-Reformation, and the Enlightenment.

Students will visit four churches to experience the differences in art, architecture, and worship that result from different historical paths. This course will examine the relationship between theological problems and the historical-cultural conditions from which they emerge.

219 History and Religion of Israel
Three hours lecture; three credits. The course traces the history of the people of Israel by exploring the Hebrew Bible and other ancient texts. These texts reveal a sacred history that wraps together their history and faith into an intricately woven story of a people’s struggle to understand themselves and their God. Throughout the course students will examine the texts historically and theologically in order to better understand the triumphs and struggles of the people of Israel and the impact religion had on their self-understanding.

220 New Testament World
Three hours lecture; three credits. The course examines the writings of the New Testament from a historical critical approach through the use of the New Testament and other historical evidence. Through this method students will learn about the impact of Hellenization in the Roman world of the first century, and the struggles of the beginnings of the Christian faith searching for meaning and its own identity apart from its Jewish roots.

254 Religion in Contemporary America
Three hours lecture; three credits. Prerequisite: English 100; recommended English 101. At the beginning of the 21st century, the expressions of religious belief and the roles which religious belief play in the lives of Americans are more varied than ever. This course will examine the current state of organized religion in the United States, via an analysis of religious traditions/ denominations which are growing and traditions/ denominations which are in decline, as well

as various psychological, sociological, and phenomenological theories which attempt to ascertain why religion remains so influential in the lives of so many Americans. Students will be encouraged to compare and contrast the various religious views and practices that we will encounter with their own.

270 Introduction to Asian Religious Thought
Three hours lecture; three credits. Prerequisite: English 101; recommended Phil 101 or Rel 201. This course is intended to serve as an introduction to some of the methods, issues & theories associated within major Asian philosophical religious systems, focusing on Vedantic Hinduism, Early Buddhism, Philosophical Taoism, & Zen Buddhism. Perennial issues which will be addressed include: the Nature of Sacred, the relationship between the Sacred and: the self,

life and death, happiness and meaning and morality. In addition to the content of the course, students should find the analytic “tools” utilized in the course helpful in all courses of study requiring critical thinking as well as in assessing the plethora of arguments and pseudo-reasoning which pervade everyday life. Films and literature will be utilized to reveal how the themes of the course extend beyond canonical religious texts. Personal reflection and group discussion exercises will also be required. This course will only satisfy one discipline to complete the Associate Degree requirement.

299 Special Topics in Religion
One to three credits. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. In-depth study of a selected topic in Religion.


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Sociology (SOC)

Sociology is the scientific study of human interaction. The sociology courses at Richard Bland College provide a basic overview of human behavior in a number of settings.

201 General Sociology
Three hours lecture; three credits. An introduction to the scientific study of human society. This course provides a foundation of basic theories and research methods that influence the study of culture, socialization, stratification, deviance and social institutions. The sequential course to SOC 201 is SOC 204.

204 Social Problems
Three hours lecture; three credits. This course examines a range of problematic issues facing society. Conflicting perspectives, research findings, theoretical explanations and societal responses will be discussed regarding such issues as: distribution of resources, national security, the environment, race, gender, family, the medical industry and the justice process.

250 Criminology
Three hours lecture; three credits. Prerequisite: SOC 201 or 204 approval of instructor. This course focuses on the role and functions of the justice bureaucracy as a means of social control. Evolution of justice system agencies, development of occupational subcultures and a range of factors influencing decision-making throughout the system will be addressed.

253 Marriage and the Family
Three hours lecture; three credits. An analysis of the relationships in premarital, marital, and post-marital situations. The wide range of topics considered include: gender roles, mate selection, evolving family structures, parenting, communication techniques, domestic abuse, divorce, non-marital lifestyles, and remarriage.

299 Special Topics in Sociology
One to three credits. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. In-depth study of a selected topic in Sociology.


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Spanish (SPAN)

Students are encouraged to continue with a modern foreign language initiated in high school or to study a new language. Generally, students with two years of high school Spanish should join Spanish 102 in the spring semester. Consult the Spanish instructor if you are uncertain about your appropriate placement.

101-102 Elementary Spanish I, II
Continuous course; four hours participation; four credits each semester. For students who have not acquired two high school units in Spanish.

Training in pronunciation, oral comprehension, basic grammar, and composition. NOTE: Students for whom Spanish is their first language cannot receive academic credit for these courses.

201-202 Intermediate Spanish I, II

Continuous course; three hours participation; three credits each semester. Prerequisite: Spanish 101, 102 or two units of high school Spanish.

Review of grammar and syntax, training in conversation and composition, and reading from the works of modern authors.

299 Special Topics in Spanish
One to three credits. Prerequisite: Spanish 202 or consent of the instructor. In-depth study of a selected topic(s) in Spanish (e.g., literature, culture, history, composition and/or conversation).


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Theatre Arts (THEA)

Richard Bland College promotes an appreciation of theatre in support of our understanding of cultural traditions. The courses in theatre provide the students a fundamental background in aesthetic principles, theories, history and traditions of the theatre. Opportunities to participate in the various aspects of theatre production and performance are available.

115 An Introduction to Acting
Three hours lecture and practical presentation; three credits. A concentration on the fundamentals of acting with practical application through improvisation, monologues and scenes prepared for classroom presentation.

132-133 Theatre Practicum
One credit hour per semester. No more than two credits may be applied to the Associate Degree. A practical course in which the student gains a greater understanding of theatre, by actively participating in a production by The Richard Bland College Players, either onstage or backstage.

201 Theatre: A Contemporary and Historical Introduction
Three hours lecture; three credits. An analytical approach to the understanding and appreciation of theatre as an art form. The course is designed for both prospective theatre majors and non- theatre students who wish to improve their understanding of theatre, both historically and aesthetically. The course will consist of lecture and discussion sessions concerning the major historic periods in theatre, with representative plays being studied. No acting is required for this class. Richard Bland

299 Special Topics in Theatre
One to three credits. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. In-depth study of a selected topic in theatre.



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College Catalog 2017 – 2018

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