Download eBooks

The RBC Library has over 70,000 ebooks in our collection! The vast majority (over 60,000) are available through the EBSCO eBook Collection, which covers all subject areas. We also have several collections provided through VIVA that focus solely on STEM areas (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math). These include Springer eBooks, Elsevier eBooks, EBL eBooks, and Ebrary eBooks.

 

It is important to understand that, depending on the collection, there may be restrictions on downloading the ebooks. Springer and Elsevier both allow you to download the ebooks as DRM-free PDFs that you can read on any device. (Elsevier only allows a chapter at a time). EBL, Ebrary, and EBSCO all use Adobe DRM to protect their ebooks and will only let you keep the book for a set period of time, usually 1-14 days. You will need to download an app (such as Bluefire Reader) or install Adobe Digital Editions to read ebooks offline. These ebooks cannot be read on a regular Kindle.

 

EBSCO eBook Collection

ebsco-ebooks-logoTo access these ebooks, simply search the catalog, click on the title of an ebook, and then click the “RBC Users” link at the bottom of the page. Login, if you’re off-campus. If you wish to download an EBSCO ebook to your computer or portable device to read offline, follow these instructions:

 

 

Questions? Try reading through our EBSCO eBook FAQs. If you can’t find the answer to your question, feel free to contact the RBC Library at (804) 862-6226 or via email at library@rbc.edu.

 

Free eBooks

Project Gutenberg – This is the grandfather of free ebook websites. They have over 42,000 ebooks available for download.

 

Google Books – Google has digitized millions of books from large college libraries and publishing companies. While the full-text is available for some books, for others you can only read chapters, view the table of contents, or retrieve basic copyright information.

 

HathiTrust – All books digitized by Google from college libraries are found here, as well as other unique collections. Many out-of-print and public domain works can be read online, while the full-text of others can be searched.

 

Internet Archive – The Internet Archive goes far beyond ebooks (although they do have 4 million of those). Dedicated to digitally preserving content published on the Internet, you can view archived video and audio as well. For a fun look at what a website looked like 10-15 years ago, check out their Wayback Machine.

 

OpenLibrary – All published books available freely in the Internet Archive are provided in this more user-friendly portal. They have over 1 million to either read or electronically borrow.

 

Free Classics from Amazon – If you have a Kindle, you can download these ebooks freely from Amazon. They also have a Lending Library where Amazon Prime members can freely borrow books that have no due date.

 

Bookshare – For students with qualifying print disabilities, access the world’s largest online library for free!